What Kind Of Coffee For French Press?

Most French press experts tend to prefer medium and dark roast coffee, which lends to the slower extraction of oils, flavor, and character of brewing. When selecting coffee beans, keywords to look out for are French roast, smooth, full-bodied, smoky, chocolate, cocoa, woody, nutty, earthy, spicy or caramel.

Contents

Can I use regular ground coffee in a French press?

For a French press to work properly, you need to use rather coarse coffee grounds. If you use finely-ground coffee, you’ll have issues with sediment in your brew, and that’s if you’re even able to get the French press’ plunger to go down in the first place.

What coffee do I buy for a French press?

Coarse and evenly ground coffee is the best for French press. Avoid buying espresso grade pre-ground coffee for french press as it can be a little too fine, resulting in a muddy sediment at the bottom of your cup. Your best bet for a good French press coffee is to grind your own at home.

Can I use Folgers in a French press?

Pour out the hot water and place 8 tablespoons of Folgers French Roast coffee grounds into the bottom of your press. Just let the coffee brew for 4 minutes. Lower the plunger, slowly, all the way down to the bottom of the pot. Once you get the plunger all the way down, turn the lid to open the spout, and pour!

Can you use medium grind coffee in a French press?

Quality French press pots have a screen fine enough to retain medium-sized grounds and coffee expands when saturated. James Hoffman is the author of The World Atlas of Coffee. He advises using medium ground coffee, stirring after four minutes, and then letting it brew for five to seven minutes.

Is Starbucks ground coffee good for French press?

Which Starbucks coffee roast is the best for French press? The best Starbucks coffee for French press would be one of their dark roasts. These help to give the coffee a fuller, richer flavor, and give you the complexity of taste, using the simple method of a French press.

Can I use drip coffee in a French press?

Can you use regular coffee in a French press? Yes, you can use regular coffee in a French press, but if it’s ground for drip or pour over, it’s likely to produce a muddy, gritty cup. The stainless steel mesh in the plunder will not filter out fine particles of ground coffee.

Can you use whole coffee beans in French press?

Why You Can’t Use Whole Beans in a French Press The process relies on immersion, like the French press method, but it also requires consistently heating the water and coffee for an hour or more. To enjoy the rich, flavorful experience you get from French Press coffee, you have to grind the coffee beans.

Do you need a kettle for a French press?

The French Press is widely used because you do not need fancy equipment like a long neck kettle, a supply of paper filters or any electricity to brew with it. The minimum ingredients to make French Press coffee are hot water, ground coffee and a French Press.

Can you use Maxwell House in a French press?

Yes, but use as bold a blend as possible or your coffee will be weak. 1 of 1 found this helpful.

Why is French press coffee so much better?

Paper filters in drip machines absorb much of the oil in your coffee grounds. French press doesn’t soak up flavor and adds tiny bits of coffee grounds in the coffee that percolates flavor. French press allows for steeping. Because the grounds steep instead of filter, the coffee tastes better.

5 Common Beginner French Press Coffee Questions Answered

I understand what it’s like to stare at a french press coffee maker with a puzzled expression. I was a little scared by it because it was the first coffee brewer I had ever purchased. It appeared to be difficult and frightening – yet it wasn’t at all. However, I was apprehensive about approaching the neighborhood baristas with queries. They weren’t exactly the warmest of individuals, especially when it came to complete newbies like myself. I’m confident that you understand what I’m talking about.

Let’s start with some of the most often asked questions by newcomers to the art of french press brewing.

Is It Worth It? Seems Like A Lot Of Work…

I’ll be completely honest with you: making coffee using a french press is not as simple as scooping grinds into a pot and letting the machine do the rest of the work. However, it does result in coffee that is significantly more tasty and satisfying. Check out this article on how manual coffee brewing may change your life. It is important to note that the french press is a manual brewing method, which means you will not be relying on an electrical gadget to perform all of the work. You will be in charge of measuring your materials, grinding the coffee, pouring in the water, timing the brew, and pressing the plunger yourself.

Yes.

No way, not at all!

Brewing takes around 4 hours.

  • Coffee with a strong scent. The metal filter of a french press allows the natural oils in the coffee to pass through to your drink. They have a strong, lively scent and impart a great deal of flavor to your brew.
  • This is a robust brew. The metal filter also allows some tiny coffee grounds to enter your drink through the opening. These enhance the flavor of your coffee and give you a “fuller” feeling after drinking it, leaving you pleased
  • The enjoyment that comes from a well-brewed cup of coffee. Okay, I realize this sounds cheesy. A truly delicious cup, on the other hand, is more than just delicious. The satisfaction of knowing that you put effort into something that turned out to be fantastic in every aspect is a personal high point.

Yes, I believe it is worthwhile. Read this article to learn why you should ditch your drip coffee pot in favor of a French press.

What Equipment Do I Need To Make French Press Coffee?

It is fairly simple to create French press coffee, and it only takes one extra particular piece of coffee equipment: a burr coffee grinder, which is available at most coffee shops. For the sake of making excellent coffee with your french press, having your own grinder is crucial for two primary reasons.

1. It enables you to brew with uber-fresh beans

Whole coffee beans are only at their best freshness for around two to three weeks after they have been roasted. Once ground, the coffee has only 20-30 minutes to reach its full potential. Because of this, grinding your coffee right before you brew it is always the best option. Using this method, the most unusual and complex tastes are preserved, making drinking from your everyday mug a truly extraordinary experience.

2. You want to use coarse grounds

With most cases, pre-ground coffee is ground to a size that works well with drip coffee makers, but it is not as effective in French press coffee makers (not to mention that it is nearly always old and stale). The little grinds become entangled in the fine mesh filter, and occasionally they are able to pass right through.

When you do this, you end up with a lot of muck in your cup, which makes it harder to press down the plunger. In order to prevent grounds from clogging or flowing straight through your filter, use a coarse grind size that produces a fantastic cup of coffee.

Should There Be Coffee Grounds In My Mug Of Coffee?

The short response is: don’t be concerned about it. Realistically, you won’t be able to escape it completely. In an ideal world, all of your coffee grinds would be exactly the same size and just big enough to pass through your french press filter without being filtered. When coffee beans are ground, however, they invariably shatter into extremely minute pieces (sometimes microscopic), which are small enough to pass through the filter and into the cup. These are referred to as “fines.” It happens even with the most technologically advanced coffee grinders on the market.

It is entirely OK and common to have a tiny quantity of coffee grinds in your mug.

You can practically consume coffee beans by the handful and not get sick (though your teeth may suffer as a result).

Should I Pour All Of The Coffee Out Of The French Press?

Without a doubt, and at all times. Even when you press the plunger all the way down, the coffee beans are still reacting with the water in some way. And that implies they’re still in the process of brewing, although at a snail’s pace. That’s a negative sign. Take a look at this article: Why You Should Be Drinking Black Coffee (And How To Start) Controlling the variables in order to obtain a balanced extraction is the key to makinga-m-a-z-i-n-gcoffee at home. When you allow your coffee to continue to brew after plunging, you run the danger of overshooting the sweet spot of taste perfection.

What Size French Press Should I Buy?

There is one issue that seems to perplex everyone (including me) about french press makers: why do they insist on using “cups” rather than “ounces” to indicate how much coffee they produce? Consider the following example: you would expect a “3 cup french press” to produce enough coffee to fill three cups. You’d be mistaken, though. They are mainly modeled on smaller European-sized cups that hold roughly 4 ounces (100ml), rather than on our somewhat bigger American-sized mugs, which are slightly greater in volume.

  • The volume of three cups is equal to twelve ounces, or 354 milliliters
  • The volume of eight cups is equal to thirty four ounces, or 1005 milliliters
  • The volume of twelve cups is equal to fifty-one ounces, or 1508 milliliters.

A typical American mug holds between eight and 10 ounces of liquid (235 to 295 ml). So multiply the number of mugs you need to create each day by eight to ten to get the total number of mugs you need to manufacture each day. This will provide you with the total amount of ounces in the container. In order to prepare three cups of coffee every day, for example, you’ll need around 24 to 30 ounces of coffee. An “8 cup” press will be more than plenty to meet your coffee requirements. A 12 cup press will almost certainly be considerably more press than you would ever need, but a 3 cup press will place you at a disadvantage because to its lesser capacity.

As a result, the 8 cup press is the most popular size, with the majority of customers purchasing it. Read this: How to Use the Golden Ratios in Coffee Brewing – Do you know of any more basic French resources?

Best Coffee for French Press? (6 Top Picks)

On the surface, the French press coffee machine appears to be one of the most straightforward brewing techniques available: Coffee should be ground, hot water should be added, and then the plunger should be pressed. What could be more straightforward? There’s one crucial step you’re overlooking: choosing the right beans. If you use the incorrect beans, you’ll wind up with a bitter-tasting cup of mud instead of the rich, refined brew you’re looking for. When it comes to French press coffee, what coffee beans are the most effective?

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THE BEST SELECTION Organic Medium Roasted Coffee (Lifeboost Coffee) These single-origin Nicaraguan beans are perfectly roasted to a balanced medium-roast character, resulting in a full-bodied, magical-tasting French Press brew that will leave you wanting more.

Getting the Most Out Of Your French Press

IMAGE PRODUCT DETAILS
Lifeboost Coffees Medium Roast
  • Nicaraguan single origin coffee
  • Medium roast
  • Full body
  • Low acidity
  • Nicaraguan single origin coffee
CHECK PRICE
Peet’s Coffee Major Dickason’s Blend
  • A perennial best-seller from one of the world’s foremost experts on dark roast coffee
  • Rich and complex, with a full-bodied flavor
  • Roasted to order, same-day shipment guarantees that the coffee is as fresh as possible
  • In the French press, floral and fruity smells truly come to life
  • Medium-roasted beans yield a sweeter cup of coffee. Layers of cedar, lavender, and cocoa are topped with ripe strawberries, pineapple, and guava.
  • Medium-roasted, single-origin Costa Rican coffee
  • Full-bodied and strong in flavor.
  • Single-origin Arabica beans are extremely popular for cold brew coffee because of their distinctive flavor. Smooth, sweet, well-balanced, and assertive in flavor
  • Fruity, chocolatey, and caramel-flavored notes
  • The wet-hulling method employed in Sumatra imparts an earthy, mushroomy taste to the beans. The rich oils and deep smokey scent of a very dark French roast are brought out by the roasting process. Using small batches of coffee to assure freshness is a good idea.

Of course, the first step is to use high-quality coffee beans in your brew. Because the French press employs a stainless steel mesh filter to screen out the grounds, more of the delectable oils and solids from the coffee bean wind up in your cup when using this method of preparing coffee. The “chewy” texture that is generated using a French press is preferred by some coffee lovers, while it is disliked by others. There are methods for reducing the amount of mud in your cup, but the fact remains that steeping coffee grounds in water and pressing them down with a mesh filter will leave a little amount of silt in your cup of coffee.

In addition to minimizing the quantity of microscopic particles that pass through the mesh filter but are not captured, a coarse grind tends to make French press coffee more flavorful and aromatic.

  • Make an investment in a high-quality french press. Here are the top french press coffee makers on the market today. Make every effort to avoid using pre-ground coffee as much as possible. It loses its freshness far too rapidly after being opened. Purchase a high-quality whole bean coffee and grind it immediately before brewing it
  • And Pour your coffee into a nice french press using a good coffee grinder (burr rather than blade) and a good french press (here is a list– avoid the cheap $1 store choices)
  • Purchase from reputable coffee roasters that roast their beans on a daily basis
  • And Clean your french press (in this manner) on a regular basis to guarantee that your brew tastes fresh.

NOTE: The French press requires a greater coffee to water ratio, with more coffee than the SCAA’s “golden ratio,” in order to be effective (55 grams per liter). We recommend using 27g of coffee for 350 ml of water (approximately 3/4 of the amount of water you’d use in a drip coffee machine), according to our French Press brew instructions. As a result, bearing all of this in mind, here are our top six recommendations for the best beans to use in a French press:

6 beans for Great Coffee with a French Press

NOTE: The French press requires a greater coffee to water ratio, with more coffee than the SCAA’s “golden ratio,” in order to be successful (55 grams per liter). We recommend using 27g of coffee for 350 ml of water (approximately 3/4 of the amount of water you’d use in a drip coffee machine), according to our French Press brewing instructions. As a result, keeping all of this in mind, here are our top six recommendations for the best beans to use in a French press:

The Verdict

All of the beans discussed here would produce a fantastic french press brew, but we’d recommend starting with the following selection:

  • A breath of fresh air Roast at medium heat if you want to have a well-balanced, guilt-free, and healthful experience, or Sumatran French Roast from Sleepy Monk you enjoy rich, fatty tastes
  • If you enjoy spicy foods

Have you tasted any of the coffees on this list?

Do you have a favorite bean that you’d like to share with us? Please share your thoughts in the comments section!

7 Best Coffee For French Press – Reviews & Buyer’s Guide

Nothing gets you out of bed in the morning like a cup of robust, full-bodied, and tasty coffee. It’s hard not to agree with this statement, and a french press may be the instrument you’ve been seeking for to help you satisfy your high-quality coffee desires. It will take you no time at all to become your very own barista thanks to the basic features and simple expertise. Simply understanding which coffee to use in your french press may help you make the most of your coffee maker and establish yourself as a genuine coffee connoisseur.

Best Coffee For French Press

Learn about the best coffee for french press as we go further into the world of coffee and give some insider trade secrets to help you step up your coffee game.

Real Good Coffee – Best French Press Roast

  • The tastes are smooth, rich, and assertive with touches of sweetness and spice
  • They are reasonably priced. Natural components
  • Compatible with the French press Arabica beans of the highest grade
Pros
  • The following tastes are not suggested for persons who appreciate complex flavors: It’s a little bitter
  • If you’re seeking for a gentler cup of coffee, go for one that is high in acid.

Real Good has over 30 years of experience in the art of coffee sourcing and roasting, and no one does it quite like them when it comes to perfection. They are based in Seattle, and their mission is to bridge the gap between affordable coffee and high-quality roasts in the coffee market. Real Good Coffee Company is devoted to its mission of delivering its dedicated customers with the strongest, most sophisticated, and consistently delicious cup of coffee possible. They acquire their Arabic coffee beans from Central and Southern America, which are 100 percent Arabic.

These beans, which have overtones of raspberry, a rich dark chocolate flavor, and a hint of spice from star anise, are devoid of artificial chemicals, additions, and preservatives, and are 100% natural.

LifeBoost Coffee – Best Organic Roast

a total cost of $29.95 ($2.50/ounce) a total of $27.95 ($2.33/ounce)

Pros
  • Certified organic coffee beans
  • High quality techniques such as hand-picking and hand-washing
  • Low acidity levels
  • Guaranteed organic coffee beans tastes that are well-balanced Reduces the severity of intestinal disorders
Pros

  • Not advised for people who want their coffee acidic
  • Not suggested for those who prefer dark roasts
  • And not recommended for those who prefer light roasts.

Not suggested for people who want their coffee acidic; not recommended for those who prefer dark roasts; and not recommended for those who prefer lighter roasts.

Death Wish Coffee – Best High Caffeine Roast

  • Coffee that is strong and powerful
  • There is no nasty aftertaste. It is also available in the form of beans or pre-ground coffee. Both the French press and the cold brew processes can benefit from this ingredient. Coffee beans that have been handpicked
Cons
  • Some people may find this roast to be overly dark
  • When compared to other brands, it is more expensive. Excessive intake can be detrimental to one’s health.

If you’re looking for a major caffeine boost, Death Wish’s French Press coffee beans should be a must-have on your shopping list. As the name indicates, its robust roasts are carefully combined for optimum caffeine production, resulting in a surprisingly potent jolt of energy. When it comes to finding a beverage or a coffee roast that will keep you going all day, this is the alternative for you to consider. One cup of Death Wish’ coffee is all you need to get through the day — no need to keep refilling your cup.

They accomplish this level of caffeine concentration through the use of a proprietary roasting procedure that entails handpicking each and every coffee bean and then slowly roasting it.

Koffee Kult Coffee – Best Gourmet Dark Roast

  • Beans that are simple, superb, and exquisite
  • Freshly packaged as though it had been roasted
  • Darkly roasted but never harsh
  • Cold brews and French press coffee are made to perfection with this machine. Flavor profiles that are unique
Cons
  • Beans that are straightforward, superb, and exquisite
  • The product is packaged fresh as if it were roasted
  • The product is dark roasted but never bitter. Cold brews and French press coffee are made possible thanks to this device. flavors that are one of a kind

Koffee Kult is the pinnacle of gourmet coffee, and they are dedicated to delivering their customers with a taste of freshness in every bag of coffee they purchase. Their beans are roasted with care in small quantities and packed as soon as possible after roasting to help retain and preserve their freshness and flavor. Each bag is labeled with a roasting date, which guarantees that they are transported within a few hours of being roasted, rather than days or weeks later. A combination of 100 percent Arabica coffee beans sourced from Sumatra, Columbia, and Guatemala, Koffee Kult’s blend is like nothing you’ve ever tasted before – and their roastmaster personally oversees each and every bean shipment.

Their unique sourcing and quality control devotion results in a coffee that is full-bodied, rich, smooth, and clean in scent, and is both robust and balanced in flavor. Just one smell of their combination will reveal both its weight and its potent flavor.

Stone Street –Best for Cold Brew

  • In every bag of coffee, Koffee Kult, the pinnacle of gourmet coffee, is committed to delivering its customers with an experience that is as fresh as the coffee itself. To ensure that their beans keep and preserve their natural freshness, they are roasted in small quantities and packed as quickly as possible. Each bag is labeled with a roasting date, ensuring that they are dispatched within a few hours of being roasted, if not minutes. Koffee Kult’s 100 percent Arabica coffee beans are sourced from Sumatra, Columbia, and Guatemala, and are a match made in heaven – with their roastmaster personally inspecting each and every shipment of coffee beans. Their unique sourcing and quality control devotion results in a coffee that is full-bodied, rich, smooth, and clean in scent, and that is both robust and balanced in flavor and aroma. Just one smell of their combination will prove both its weight and its potent nature.
Cons

  • Its sweeter flavor profile may be less appealing to certain people. Suitable for cold brews only
  • Not suitable for hot coffee. Those who prefer medium roasts are advised to avoid this product.

Stone Street’s coffee in New York City is the greatest coarse ground coffee in the market, making it ideal for french press coffee and cold brews as well. Because they place a great value on bean procurement and the quality of their grinding process, you can anticipate a truly exceptional cup of coffee from their goods. This mix of coffee, which has been flown in from Columbia, where they cultivate their own beans, is on the sweeter end of the spectrum, with undertones of maple syrup and a rich nutty scent to top it all off – fantastic taste profiles for a rich, indulgent brew.

Furthermore, thanks to their three-layer packing technology, you will always have the freshest and most fragrant roast of coffee at your disposal.

Coffee Bros. – Best Fresh Beans

There were no goods discovered on Amazon’s auto-generated links.

Pros
  • Ideal for a cup of hot coffee
  • Working with a French press, espresso machine, and drip brewer is also a possibility
  • Coffee with a full-bodied, rich flavor
  • Affordable
  • Coffee beans of the highest quality
Cons
  • Acidity is very high. Great for hot coffee, but not so good for cold brew coffee
  • Those who enjoy bitter roasts should avoid this product.

The coffee beans used in Coffee Bros.’ microlot coffee, also known as an extreme version of a single origin brew, are as unique as it gets when it comes to coffee. Irrespective of whether you make your coffee in a French press or an espresso machine (or both), the coffee beans keep their incredible rich, powerful taste until the very end. Coffee Bros. obtains their coffee from the best producers in Ethiopia and Brazil, including Yirgacheffe and Minas Gerais, respectively. A decade’s worth of trial and error and finally perfection went into perfecting their method of producing their 100 percent Arabica coffee beans.

provides a vast assortment of coffee from light to dark roasts, their medium-roasted coffee, which has notes of caramel and chocolate as well as fresh lemon acidity, is the one we recommend.

Peet’s Coffee – Best Budget Beans

  • A microlot coffee, often described as an extreme version of a single origin brew, is produced by Coffee Bros. and contains coffee beans that are among the most distinctive available. Irrespective of whether you make your coffee in a French press or an espresso machine (or both), the coffee beans keep their incredible rich, strong taste all the way through. In order to bring you the best possible coffee, Coffee Bros. gets its beans from the best growers in Ethiopia and Brazil, including Yirgacheffe. A decade’s worth of trial and error and finally perfection went into developing their method of raising 100 percent Arabica beans. Even though Coffee Bros. provides a vast assortment of coffee from light to dark roasts, their medium-roasted coffee, which has notes of caramel and chocolate as well as fresh lemon acidity, is the one I like.
Cons
  • The coffee beans used in Coffee Bros.’ microlot coffee, also known as an extreme version of a single origin brew, are as unique as coffee can be. Whether you use a French press, an espresso machine, or a drip brewer, the coffee beans keep their incredible rich, powerful taste till the very end of the brewing process. Coffee Bros. draws their coffee from the best producers in Ethiopia and Brazil, including Yirgacheffe and Minas Gerais. Growing their 100 percent Arabica beans is the culmination of decades of trial and error, followed by years of refinement. Even though Coffee Bros. provides a vast assortment of coffee from light to dark roasts, their medium-roasted coffee, which produces a full-bodied coffee with undertones of caramel and chocolate and crisp lemon acidity, is the one we recommend.

Have you ever heard of a coffee mix that is flavored with butter? Peet’s by Major Dickason is a delectable combination of freshly roasted coffee beans and butter-infused essential oils that is sure to please. It’s enough to make you salivate simply by smelling the roast. Peet’s Coffee has a long and illustrious history, dating back to its founding in Berkeley, California, in 1966, and is overseen by specialists with extensive expertise in the coffee industry. With volcanic soil providing a natural layer of fertilizer, this enterprise has completely re-imagined organic coffee production and distribution.

Sweet and smokey notes are released just by the smell of the beans.

every one of them

Your Personal French Press Coffee Buying Guide

Aside from ensuring that the coffee is of high quality, selecting the ideal roast for your French press is a personal choice. Finding out what kind of grind and roast you want for your coffee is the first step in making a hearty cup of boiling hot French pressed coffee that will leave you feeling satisfied. The time and temperature of the roasting process are two of the most important aspects in determining the flavor of the finished product.

So light roasts are the greatest choice for individuals who prefer milder brews; dark roasts are the best choice for those who want stronger tastes and larger, bolder aromas. It’s just a question of personal preference.

Light Roast

Lightly roasted coffee beans have a very weak color and a low oil content, making them ideal for brewing. These often have the highest amounts of acidity to compliment their distinct tastes, which makes them very appealing. Despite the fact that light roasts are rather typical for your regular cup of coffee, they are not as suitable for a French press since their tastes are too mild and easy on the tongue.

Medium Roast

When it comes to French press coffee, mild or medium roasts are excellent choices. They have a somewhat deeper brown hue and an oily surface, but their flavor profile is well-rounded and well-balanced. They are available in a variety of sizes and shapes. The medium roasting procedure guarantees that the natural flavor of the beans is kept while the sweetness of the caramel-like hints is intensified in the cup.

Medium-Dark Roast

When it comes to French press coffee, medium dark roasts are frequently the finest choice since these beans ensure that you enjoy every note of rich chocolate and flowery overtones in every drink. Their color deepens significantly throughout the roasting process, and despite the fact that they have a more oily surface, they contain significantly lower amounts of acidity as compared to medium-roasted beans. However, when compared to other varieties, they have the greatest taste and the largest body.

Dark Roast

Dark roasted coffee is the finest choice for individuals who like their coffee to be quite robust in flavor. It is impossible to overlook the dark brown hue of these beans, which have low acidity levels despite their attempts to embody darker, richer, and deeper tastes, which include major traces of nuts, chocolate, and caramel. While this roast is ideal for a cup of espresso, it may not be the greatest choice for a cup of French press.

FAQs

The ideal coffee for French press is a dark, low acidic, bold brand of coffee such as Real Good French Roast Extra Dark Whole Coffee Beans, which is dark, low acidic, and robust.

How to French press coffee?

To begin, add a heaping spoonful of coffee to a 200ml saucepan of boiling water and stir well. In a slow, steady motion, put the plunger into the pot until it stops just above the level of water and ground coffee. Allow it to sit for 3-4 minutes before carefully exerting pressure by pressing down on the plunger to see whether it works. Follow this step-by-step method to making coffee with a french press.

What is the perfect french press coffee ratio?

It is ideal to use a 1:12 coffee to water ratio when making French press coffee. For example, if you are using 350 grams of water, you may add 30 grams of coffee to the mix. You may always make changes to this to suit your own needs and tastes.

What kind of coffee do you use in a French press?

A 1:12 coffee to water ratio is ideal for French press coffee. Pour 30 grams of coffee into 350 grams of water if you’re making a mug of coffee. If you have any particular preferences, you can always make changes to this setting.

Can you use regular ground coffee in a French press?

Although you may use ordinary ground coffee in a French press, it is widely accepted that coarsely ground coffee and water that is slightly below boiling temperature are the finest combinations.

It All Boils Down To…

‘Can you tell me how to make a nice French press coffee?’ and if that’s a question you’ve been asking yourself recently, you’ve come to the perfect place. You’ll find all you need right here. The task of compiling a list of the greatest coffees available on the market is quite difficult, especially considering the large number of options accessible to consumers. Additionally, coffee is a highly personal decision, and what one person considers to be meat may be poison to another. To conclude, be sure to give Real Good French Roast Extra Dark Whole Coffee Beans a go before you dismiss them.

French press coffee is the most dependable way of brewing a cup of joe that is faithful to the very spirit of the bean.

Despite the fact that

About the Author

Keren is a regular contributor to Twigs Cafe’s online magazine. Keren spends her free time looking into space or consuming large amounts of coffee when she is not really typing away at her laptop. She is, without a doubt, quite productive even when she is not on the clock. If you listen closely enough, you’ll hear the whooshing sound of numerous words as they fly by in her mind – of course, this is all in her head.

What Kind of Coffee Should I Make in My French Press?

“What sort of coffee should I brew with my French press?” is a question that many individuals who are new to the world of French press ask. Is there a single correct answer to this question? Do some coffee beans taste better when brewed in a French press than when made in a drip machine?

Why is the French press so popular?

To address this question, let’s take a step back and consider why so many people are smitten with the French press. Of course, French press coffee machines are frequently aesthetically appealing pieces of furniture. The French press, whether made of glass or stainless steel, always retains a lovely shape and appearance. However, I believe that the success of the coffee press might be attributed to its simplicity. Consider the following scenario: in the event of a power outage, you could still prepare coffee if you had a manual grinder, a wood burner to boil water on, and a French press.

The other advantage is that there is no waste produced.

Are some beans better than others for the French press?

Let’s get back to the initial question, which has something to do with the device’s simplicity. When it comes to brewing coffee in a French press, I believe that you can pretty much create whatever you want with a little creativity. So the answer to the question “what flavor of coffee should I produce in my French press?” is straightforward: whatever you want. It’s absolutely up to you what you do! In reality, if you’re using high-quality beans, the type of coffee you use to make decent French press coffee has very little to do with how well the coffee turns out (for example one from South America or one from Africa).

Getting the grind down pat, on on the other hand, is critical. A typical French press blunder is to use the incorrect grind for the job. Having said that, while you may create a vehicle that is equally as excellent as a

FrenchPress Coffee Guide

The shop will not function properly if cookies are deactivated on your computer or device. Two Frenchmen had previously applied for a patent on this technique of preparing coffee when it was invented (Mayer and Delforge). After being greatly modified by the Italian Attilia Calimani in 1929, the French press was given the form and design that has remained unchanged to this day, which is still in use today.

Coffee for Frenchpress

A certain sort of bean that is particularly well suited for this style of coffee preparation is not readily available. Brewing the coffee using a french press allows the fragrance and taste of the chosen bean to develop nicely, depending on your own tastes. The use of a lighter to medium roast with a high proportion of Arabica, 100 percent Arabica blends, or single origins is recommended in the vast majority of situations, albeit not always. Coffees that we can suggest and that we personally enjoy: Caffe Varesina is a top-rated coffee shop (intense taste, balanced aroma).

Grind level for French Press

The coarseness of the grind for the French press is important (coarser then for e.g. Drip Brew, a bit like sea salt)

Amount of coffee

We propose about 60g of ground coffee – 8 table spoons – for the making of 1 Liter of coffee (7,5g per spoon). According to personal preference and the type of coffee bean used, these characteristics should only be used as a general guide. You should experiment with different dosages and allow yourself to be surprised by the (good) outcomes!

Brewing Coffee with the Frenchpress

If at all feasible, make use of freshly ground coffee.

2. | Fill the French Press

Fill your French press halfway with the right amount of coffee.

3. | Pre-Heat water

Pour hot, but not boiling, water over the coffee in a circular motion to make it more palatable. The optimal water temperature is between 93 and 97 degrees Celsius. For the same coffee, experiment with different temperature settings. You might be surprised by the results!

5. | Stir

Then use a circular motion to pour hot, but not boiling, water on the coffee. Ideally, the water should be between 93 and 97 degrees Celsius. For the same coffee, experiment with different temperature settings. You may be amazed at the outcomes!

6. | Close it up

Place the French Press on top of the stove.

7. | Let the coffee sit

Allow 3 to 5 minutes for the coffee to brew (for a moderate flavor) (strong). Place the top of the french press on top of the machine without pushing it down.

8. | Press coffee

After you’ve selected a brewing time, carefully and evenly press the button down.

9. | Enjoy

As soon as you’ve decided on a brew time, gently and evenly push the press down.

French Press Taste characteristics

French press coffee is distinguished by a richer flavor and, in contrast to filter coffee, in which the coffee oils remain in the filter, a greater amount of scent and body.

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Best Coffee for French Press

For almost a decade, I’ve been a fan of the French press, and I’m always on the search for the greatest coffee for the French press. To be honest, using a French press was the very first way of making coffee I ever learnt! It wasn’t until around 5 years ago that I learned how to use a standard drip coffee machine properly. Given my previous expertise with this brewing method, I’ve experimented with a variety of various coffees using the French press. Some were fantastic, some were mediocre, and a couple were downright disgusting.

In the meantime, I’ve been working on polishing my French press brew method and learning how to pick the best coffee for French press. As a result, I haven’t had a terrible cup of French press coffee in a very long time. I spoke with the co-founder to further understand why this is the case.

Best Coffee for French Press at a Glance

Here are three alternatives from Onda Origins, one of my favorite small-batch coffee roasters, if you’re only searching for which coffee to buy for the finest French press coffee:

  1. Here are three alternatives from Onda Origins, one of my favorite small-batch coffee roasters, if you’re only searching for which coffee to purchase for the finest French press coffee:
Onda Origins is a Seattle-based roaster that I discovered back in 2016 at theUrban Craft Uprising holiday market.

To my surprise, I discovered that they work directly with young farmers and pay them directly using traceable blockchain technology in order to ensure that they get a livable wage for their efforts. To put that into perspective, Onda has assisted Ivonne Herrera in more than doubling her income since the two of them began collaborating. Onda provides you with a receipt for every bag you purchase that details exactly how much of your purchase was returned to the farmer. When Onda Origins came out to me about collaborating, I was ecstatic since I already consider them to be one of the top coffee roasters in Seattle and believe they roast excellent coffee beans for French press coffee.

If you’re curious about why some beans are more expensive than others, read on.

Choosing the Best Coffee Beans for French Press

To my surprise, I discovered that they deal directly with young farmers and pay them directly using traceable blockchain technology in order to ensure that they receive a livable wage. As an example, Onda has assisted Ivonne Herrera in more than doubling her income since the two of them began collaborating. Onda provides you with a receipt for every bag you purchase, detailing exactly how much of your purchase was returned to the farmer. The fact that Onda Origins had reached out to me about collaborating excited me since I already considered them to be one of the greatest coffee roasters in Seattle and believe they roast excellent coffee beans for French press.

Find out why some beans are more popular than others.

Buy farm-grown whole beans that were roasted recently

You should purchase beans that have been roasted within the last week since oxidation occurs after the beans have been roasted. When purchasing coffee beans, it is also important to consider the sort of bean that is being utilized. In general, you want to seek for Arabica beans that can be traced back to their source farms rather than giant coffee cooperatives that conceal the origin of their beans. There are two varieties of coffee beans in the world: Arabica and Robusta. Arabica is the more common variety.

Robusta beans are the sort of beans that coffee firms such as Starbucks utilize since they are more cheap.

While robusta beans may be used to make excellent coffee, Arabica beans produce a cup of coffee that is of greater quality in general. Apart from purchasing whole Arabica coffee beans that have not been roasted,

Know the difference between French press and other brew methods

The French press differs from other brewing processes in two ways: the type of filter it employs and the amount of time it takes to brew. Because of the particular mix of these two factors, French press coffee has a larger body and brings out the sweet taste profiles of the coffee beans used in the press. What is the reason behind this? Let us first examine the function that filters play in the process. If you’re looking for filters, a traditional drip coffee machine, a Chemex, and an aeropress are all good options.

“Consider the best cup of coffee you’ve ever tasted at brunch.

French press uses a metal filter instead.

Metal permits the compounds to travel through to your cup, allowing you to appreciate the subtleties of that particular coffee. Tupper noted that because coffee has a higher degree of chemical complexity than wine, metal filters allow you to taste tones that would otherwise be lost if you used paper filters. The other aspect that distinguishes the French press is the amount of time it takes to brew. Tupper added that the French press is an immersion brewing technique, which means that you’re immersing the coffee in 200°F water in a contained environment for around 9 minutes and not allowing anything to flow out of the coffee.

Fun fact: The brewing technique used to make espresso is a metal filter.

Tupper

Determine what coffee style you prefer

Because of the distinct brewing characteristics noted above, French presses produce a cup of coffee that is full-bodied, well-rounded, and often sweeter than other types of coffee. If you enjoy this style of coffee, you will most likely enjoy French press coffee. The other item to consider when selecting the best coffee for French press is whether or not you want to flavor your coffee with anything extra, such as cream or sugar. For example, I drink my coffee with a splash of whole milk every morning, therefore the French press is an excellent brewing technique for me.

This is due to the fact that, in general, coffees with chocolaty or earthy flavor profiles pair better with milk than coffees with very acidic or fruity qualities.

Look at the roast and tasting notes

Because French press produces a fuller-bodied cup of coffee, darker roasts may be extremely flavorful. Consequently, if you don’t care for really strong coffee, choose for light to medium roasts instead. In my experience, dark French roasts make a French press taste bitter, therefore you will never find them in my home. The other thing to look for when buying for the finest coffee beans for French press are the tasting notes printed on the package of coffee beans. Tupper also suggests that you opt for tastes that are sweeter and nutty, such as chocolate or hazelnut.

He stated that, based on his observations, those who enjoy French press coffee are more likely to prefer these sorts of notes. He has discovered that persons who enjoy fruitiness are more likely to choose brewing methods that employ paper processes, allowing them to enjoy a more fruity brew.

When in doubt, ask the barista

Tupper advises you to rely on your barista since they are exposed to coffee on a daily basis, says Tupper. Aside from that, they can typically assist you in determining the finest coffee for French press depending on your individual taste preferences. If a customer comes into Onda Origins CafeRoastery in the Hillman City area of South Seattle, Tupper says the first question he asks is what sort of brewing process they employ at home. As a result, if they specify French press, he will direct them toward coffees that have sweeter and nuttier aromas.

So if you live in Seattle, stop by their cafe and talk with a barista to choose the right cup of coffee to go with your meal.

French Press Brew Guide

Once you’ve discovered the best coffee for French press, how do you brew it so that you can produce the ideal cup of coffee every time? I requested Tupper to divulge all of his French press brewing secrets in this French press brew guide. Mr. Tupper revealed that he makes use of a reduced version of the James Hoffmann French press technique, which was invented by the same-named famed UK-based coffee specialist. Here is the procedure he recommends.

Measure a 1:16 ratio of beans to water

Tupper advises starting with a 1:16 ratio of beans to water when experimenting with other ratios. This indicates that for every ounce of coffee you consume, you should consume 16 ounces of water. As an example, I have a 32-ounce French press that makes around three 12-ounce cups of brewed coffee, so this is a significant save. In order to maintain the 1:16 ratio, I add around 2 ounces of coffee to each 32 ounces of water. This 1:16 ratio, on the other hand, is only a beginning point. You can experiment with the proportions to make the coffee that you enjoy.

If you like a milder flavor, increase the ratio to 1:17, 1:18, etc.

Bring your water to a boil

While your kettle is heating water on the stove, you may get started on the rest of your preparations. When filling your kettle, make sure you use cold tap water rather than boiling water. However, while it may be tempting to start with hot water, the water that was used to heat it up has been lying in your hot water tank for some time, accumulating sediments.

Coarsely grind whole beans

In an electric grinder, pulse your beans a few times to make coarse grinds before using them. I use an inexpensive Krups electric grinder to ground the beans till they are the size of coarse kosher salt, although there are burr grinders that allow you to vary the grind size settings, which I like to use. It doesn’t have to be an exact science, but the important thing is to avoid grinding the beans too finely for the French press. This is due to the fact that finer grinds might get past the metal filter.

Courser grinds also make it less likely that you’ll oversteep your coffee, resulting in harsh notes being left behind. It’s important to remember that the French press brew instruction drowns the coffee with water in a French press.

Rinse your French press with hot water

Filling a cold French press halfway with hot water from the kettle helps to keep the temperature below the acceptable 203 degrees Fahrenheit. For best results, rinse the empty French press with boiling water from your kettle or run it under hot tap water just before your kettle is set to whistle to assist maintain the proper temperature.

Add grounds to the French press

Filling a cold French press halfway with hot water from the kettle helps to keep the temperature below the required 203°F for coffee. For best results, rinse the empty French press with boiling water from your kettle or run it under hot tap water just before your kettle is about to whistle to assist maintain the proper temperature.

Create a bloom with hot water

When your kettle whistles to indicate that the water is boiling at 212°F, remove it from the stovetop element immediately. Allow it to settle for around 15 seconds to bring the temperature down to the desired 200°F range. As soon as you’re ready, carefully pour the hot water into the French press in a gentle circular motion until all of the grounds are just moistened. In addition, you’ll see that the coffee begins to bubble up like a muffin top. This is an example of a bloom. You want to soak the ground just enough to have it moist, but not so much that water can be seen below the bloom.

You should cease pouring water into the French press when you reach this point.

Steep for 30 seconds, then break the bloom

Steep only the coffee bloom for about 30 seconds, or until it is fragrant. If necessary, bring the water in your kettle back to a boil while you’re waiting so that the water at the proper temperature when you add the next ingredients. After 30 seconds, twist the French press to break up the bloom and remove it from the coffee. If you smell it at this stage, you’ll notice that it has a distinct coffee scent to it. In fact, Tupper stated that this is the most enjoyable aspect of the French press brew process!

Fill the rest of the French press with water and steep for 3-4 more minutes

Add the remaining 200°F water to the French press and close the lid with the plunger up to complete the process. You should notice the coffee beginning to sink to the bottom of the cup.

Gently stir the crust at top

Add the remaining 200°F water to the French press and close the lid with the plunger up to complete the brewing. Start looking for signs that the coffee is settling toward the bottom.

Steep 4-5 more minutes

Finish steeping to allow the leftover grinds to settle to the bottom of the cup or mug.

Plunge and serve

Your coffee will be ready to serve after around 9 minutes of steeping time total. Tupper actually recommends not plunging the French press, but rather pressing it just enough to allow the filter to come into contact with the surface of the liquid.Pro tip from me: I do this with the spout opening pointing toward the sink to catch any coffee that explodes out (yes, that has happened to me before when I plunged too quickly).

This really blew my mind, but he explained that it keeps all of the grounds and sludge in the bottom of the press and out of your cup of coffee. Even if you don’t use the plunger, the filter will still collect it as you pour. He, on the other hand, stated

Course correct next time

If you observed that your coffee didn’t turn out quite right, here are some suggestions for how to make it better the next time. It is possible that you under extracted the coffee if it is excessively acidic or weak. Next time, let it in for a little longer before jumping in. If the coffee tastes bitter, it means that you over extracted it. This also implies that one of three things occurred:

  1. The terrain was excessively fine, rather than gritty, as was intended. You used too much hot water, which caused the beans to become burned. You left it steeping for an excessive amount of time.

Change these things in that order the next time you make a brew to see if it improves.

Best Coffee for a French Press in Summary

Hopefully, this guide has assisted you in not just identifying the finest coffee for French press, but also in understanding why they are the greatest. If you recall nothing else, keep these things in mind:

  • It is our hope that this guide has assisted you in not just identifying the best coffee for French press, but also in understanding why. Keep these things in mind if nothing else:
  • Coffee from Brazil, Cocarive, is a lighter medium roast with a lighter flavor. Despite having a little nutty flavor, it is quite palatable. A medium roast made with Guatemalan single-origin beans, roasted by Ivonne Herrera. It has milk chocolate flavors as well as a slight fruitiness to it, akin to a holiday candy that has a small amount of fruit liqueur in it. Neo Noir is a medium roast that is deeper in color. Despite the fact that it is smokey and powerful, it has a rich nutty flavor while being sweet.

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