What Country Drinks The Most Coffee? (Correct answer)

2. Who drinks the most? When it comes to coffee consumption, only two nations top more than 10kg per person per year – Finland and Sweden, according to statistics from the International Coffee Organization. The Finnish drink the most coffee every year, at 12.5kg each.

Contents

Which country drinks the most coffee 2019?

Finland is the world’s top coffee consuming nation per capita. There is a report from Nordic Coffee Culture which found that 6% of Finnish women and 14% of Finnish men drink more than ten cups of coffee per day.

Which country consumes the most coffee 2021?

Luxembourg is the world’s biggest coffee consumer, with a whopping 11.1 kilos consumed per capita in a year. Nepal, India and Pakistan are the world’s biggest coffee abstainers. Each country drinks less than 0.1 kilos per capita a year.

Why does Finland drink so much coffee?

Why do Finnish people drink so much coffee? It’s thought the trend came about because of the extreme cold here – temperatures dip as low as -40C (-40F) in northern Finland. This makes a warm Thermos, or coming home to a cup of coffee, inviting.

What ethnicity drinks the most coffee?

The highest annual per-person consumption is in Scandinavian countries, where long, dark, and cold winters make coffee highly prized.

What City drinks the most coffee?

It may not be a surprise to learn that the Number One state for drinking coffee is New York. New Yorkers sure love their coffee. In NYC, there seems to be a coffee shop on every corner. They not only consume more of it than any other state, but they also pay the most for a cup of cappuccino compared to other states.

Who drinks the most coffee in Europe?

The 10 European countries that drink the most coffee

  • The Netherlands. Consuming a colossal 8.3kg of coffee per capita, the Dutch are the coffee maniacs of Europe, with many drinking up to 4 cups a day.
  • Finland.
  • Sweden.
  • Norway.
  • Germany.
  • Switzerland.
  • Italy.
  • Estonia.

Why do Scandinavians drink so much coffee?

Higher taxes on alcohol and alcohol production meant the Scandinavians had to find themselves another vice to occupy themselves. This crown was bestowed on the humble coffee bean. And the rest, they say, is history. Religion surprisingly played quite a part in the growth in popularity of coffee in the Nordic countries.

Do the Finns drink a lot?

The alcohol consumption of Finns is extremely unevenly distributed. A small part of the population does not drink at all, a large part drinks a little, most of them moderately, and a small part excessively.

Do Finns drink the most coffee in the world?

The Finns consume an amazing 12 kilograms of coffee per capita annually, putting them at the top of the world. (This cup is from Finnish tableware manufacturer Arabia.) Who would have guessed? The Finns are among the biggest coffee drinkers in the world, and have been for decades.

The Countries That Drink The Most Coffee

Which country has the most affection for the much adored coffee bean? We’ve created a globe map based on per capita coffee consumption, and the Finns come out on top as the most caffeinated nation. In one year, they consume an amazing 12kg of coffee per person, according to statistics from the International Coffee Organization (ICO). There is a lot of coffee consumed in Finland’s neighboring countries, including Norway, Iceland, Denmark, and Sweden; possibly this is due to the chilly weather that they all experience?

The following are the top 20 coffee consumers in the world, measured in pounds per capita per year:

  1. Among the countries with the highest weights are Finland with 26.5 lbs, Norway with 21.8 lbs, Iceland with 19.8 lbs, Denmark with 19.18 lbs, the Netherlands with 18.5 lbs, Sweden with 18 lbs, Switzerland with 17.4 lbs, Belgium with 14.9 lbs, Luxembourg with 14 lbs, Canada with 13.7 lbs, Bosnia and Herzegovina with 13.4 lbs, Austria with 13 lbs, Italy with 12.8 lbs, Slovenia with 12.8 lbs, Germany with

The Top Coffee-Consuming Countries

Coffee is one of the most widely consumed hot beverages in the world.

  • Because it is the only country other than Europe to rank among the world’s top 10 coffee users, Canada stands out from the rest of the globe. The traditional Finnish method of brewing coffee is a variant on Turkish coffee, in which water and coffee grounds are repeatedly brought to a simmer before being removed from the heat. Dutch explorer Pieter van der Broecke returned from Yemen with live coffee trees in 1616, and this was the first time that live coffee trees had been brought back to Europe.

Because it is the only country other than Europe to rank among the world’s top 10 coffee users, Canada stands apart from the rest of the pack. Finland’s traditional method of brewing coffee is a variant on the conventional Turkish method, in which the water and coffee grounds are repeatedly brought just barely to boiling point; Pieter van der Broecke brought back live coffee plants from Mocha, Yemen, to the Netherlands in 1616, becoming the Dutch the first Europeans to do so.

1 – Finland: 26.45 lbs per capita

If you’ve ever met a Finn, you’re undoubtedly aware that the national average of 26.45 lbs (12 kg) per capita is probably on the low end of the scale for the majority of people in the country. Taken out of the equation, the national average would be significantly higher if children were not included. Coffee is frequently taken throughout the day, every day, and coffee breaks are mandated by the majority of labor organizations. Special celebrations and post-church luncheons are marked by the presence of a coffee table, which serves a buffet of cold sandwiches, pieces of bread, cookies and cakes, and, of course, an unending supply of “khavi.” The most widely consumed coffees in Finland are very light roasts, which are far lighter than those consumed anyplace else in the world.

Finnish coffee culture may have developed as a result of a variety of factors, including Lutheran work ethic, Swedish domination, and a number of bans on drinking coffee, but one thing is certain: coffee will not be phased out anytime soon.

If you are ever invited to a Finnish home, expect to be welcomed with open arms.

2 – Norway: 21.82 lbs per capita

Coffee became popular in Norway in the early 18th century, when the rich began to drink it. This was similar to the case in most European nations. Despite the fact that Norway was a developing country at the time, being dominated by Denmark had its advantages, which in this instance included a plentiful supply of inexpensive coffee. When served black, kaffe is traditionally offered during breakfast and with dessert after supper. Additionally, Norwegians frequently invite guests over particularly for coffee, which is usually provided with cakes and pastries.

Don’t forget to taste “karsk,” a drink prepared of weakly brewed coffee, sugar, and a generous serving of moonshine that is popular in rural Norway. Don’t be concerned if it’s too strong; you can always set it alight to burn off some of the alcohol.

3 – Iceland: 19.84 lbs per capita

If there is any association between chilly regions and a cup of coffee, it is that it may serve to lend the right touch of warmth to spending the day indoors on a frigid, gloomy day. Iceland, like its northern European predecessors, is a coffee-loving nation on the island of Iceland. Unlike in other parts of the world, you won’t find coffee giants like Starbucks or Second Cup in Iceland’s capital city of Reykjavik. However, there is no shortage of smaller, independently owned coffee shops dotted across the city, many of which are within walking distance of each other.

4 – Denmark: 19.18 lbs per capita

When it comes to coffee, the Nordic countries are the monarchs, and this country is properly known as the Danish Prince of the hot brown beverage. The average daily consumption of coffee in the kingdom is around 1.46 cups. The same as in other Nordic countries, coffee is historically provided at each meal in Denmark, and it becomes the focal point of special events when it is served alongside cookies, cakes, and miniature sandwiches. Another study shows that the Danes are the sixth most costly coffee drinkers in the world, meaning that each of those coffees costs them a hefty penny.

5 – Netherlands: 18.52 lbs per capita

When Pieter van den Broecke returned from Yemen with live coffee plants in 1616, he became the first European to do so. Pieter van den Broecke was the first European to bring live coffee trees back to Europe. This was followed by the utilization of the beans from these coffee bushes to establish the first Dutch coffee plantations, with the colonies of Java and Suriname later emerging as key exporters of coffee to the European market. Currently, coffee shops in Amsterdam are well-known for providing coffee alongside another speciality item: marijuana (but don’t let that cloud your judgment), and the country’s coffee culture is still robust and vibrant.

“Koffietijd” (Coffee Time) is a time when coffee is provided in the house, generally with cookies and pastries to accompany it.

Protestants have always dominated the northern hemisphere, and they like to offer coffee with only one biscuit, which is regarded as a humble gesture.

6 – Sweden: 18 lbs per capita

A Swedish notion known as “fika,” which translates as “coffee break,” is very popular. It is indicated that cookies or pastries should be served together with this notion. It is possible to have a “fika” in a number of scenarios, whether it is a break during the workday or a social event. The one thing that all of these things have in common is that they all include coffee. Swedish people take their coffee seriously, to the point where it has become more than just a beverage in the country, but a way of life for many.

Despite the fact that coffee may be savored in the privacy of one’s own home, coffee is, for the most part, a social engagement. Large cities such as the Swedish capital, Stockholm, have an abundance of coffee shops, both chains and independently owned establishments to choose from.

7 – Switzerland: 17.42 lbs per capita

A Swedish custom known as “fika,” which translates as “coffee break,” has emerged. A cookie or a pastry is indicated in this notion, as is the matching of two desserts. A “fika” can refer to a range of scenarios, such as a break during the workday or a social gathering with other people. In all of these stories, the one thing that has remained constant is the presence of coffee. In Sweden, many people are quite serious about their coffee, to the point that it has become more than just a beverage; it has become a whole lifestyle for many people.

Coffee shops, franchises, and independent establishments may be found in plenty in big cities such as Stockholm, the Swedish capital.

8 – Belgium: 15 lbs per capita

The image of waffles and beer that comes to mind when you think of Belgium is likely to be accurate, but Belgium has a long history of matching their national love with chocolate with their coffee. Belgium, as a former colonial power in Africa, was able to meet its need for coffee by cultivating the plant in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Rwanda. Now that there are coffee shops in every town, it’s simple to get a fast cup of coffee to go along with the world-famous waffles that are the country’s equivalent to a doughnut.

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9 – Luxembourg: 14.33 lbs per capita

Luxembourg may be a little nation, but it has a tremendous passion for coffee, and it shows. This low-income western European country consumes an average of 14.33 pounds (6.5 kg) of alcohol per capita per year. Coffee shops abound in Luxembourg City, the country’s capital, providing both pure filter drip coffee and artisanal beverages made with local ingredients. There are several types of espresso beverages that are unique to Luxembourg, such a “lait Russe” or “Russian Milk,” which is similar to a latte, and a “café gourmand,” which is a sort of espresso drink that originated in France and is designed to be served with a dessert.

10 – Canada: 14.33 lbs per capita

Canadians are notable for being the only non-European country to be in the top ten list of the world’s most avid coffee drinkers. Canadians adore their coffee, and this is true from east to west. In addition to well-known national chains, every Canadian community is frequently home to a number of small, independently owned businesses. Because the beverage is so widely used in this country of 37 million people, the Coffee Association of Canada declares it to be the most widely consumed beverage among adults in the country.

Cold temperatures and lengthy winters have been identified as a prominent draw factor, luring locals into the appeal of a hot brown beverage throughout the winter months.

Top 25 Coffee Consuming Nations

Rank Country Coffee Consumption (Lbs per Person Per Year)
1 Finland 26.45
2 Norway 21.82
3 Iceland 19.84
4 Denmark 19.18
5 Netherlands 18.52
6 Sweden 18
7 Switzerland 17.42
8 Belgium 15
9 Luxembourg 14.33
10 Canada 14.33
11 Bosnia and Herzegovina 13.67
12 Austria 13.45
13 Italy 13
14 Brazil 12.79
15 Slovenia 12.79
16 Germany 12.13
17 Greece 11.9
18 France 11.9
19 Croatia 11.24
20 Cyprus 10.8
21 Lebanon 10.58
22 Estonia 9.92
23 Spain 9.92
24 Portugal 9.48
25 United States 9.26

The World’s Top Coffee Consuming Nations

International Coffee Day is celebrated on October 1st, and we love to mark the occasion! In this worldwide celebration of coffee, we will be serving flat whites, espresso drinks, and other delicious coffee beverages from throughout the world. Taking the time to lift a cup and enjoy a cup of coffee is essential to us, and we recognize and respect this. Every year, we consume more than 150 million bags of coffee all around the world. At this context, we are referring to the enormous burlap sacks of green coffee beans that you may see in a coffee roaster’s warehouse or distribution center.

  • Have you ever wondered who consumes the most amount of coffee in the world?
  • While the oldest evidence of coffee use dates back to the middle of the 15th century in Yemen, which country today is the most enthusiastic consumer of the much-loved coffee bean?
  • Yes, Finland is the best country in the world when it comes to coffee consumption.
  • Finland’s neighbors are just as eager for a cup of coffee as we are.

Norway, Iceland, Denmark, and Sweden are also among the top ten coffee consumers in the world, according to the ranking. According to data compiled by WorldAtlas.com, the following are the top ten nations in terms of per capita coffee consumption: based on a person’s annual income

  1. Finland has 12 kg
  2. Norway has 9.9 kg
  3. Iceland has 9 kg
  4. Denmark has 8.7 kg
  5. The Netherlands has 8.4 kg
  6. Sweden has 8.2 kg
  7. Switzerland has 7.9 kg
  8. Belgium has 6.8 kg
  9. Luxembourg has 6.5 kg
  10. Canada has 6.2 kg
  11. And the United States has 6.2 kg.

How do people around the world take their cup of coffee?

It may come as a surprise to learn that Brazil is ranked tenth in the world in terms of coffee consumption per capita. Given that Brazil has been the world’s largest producer of coffee beans for the past 150 years, one would expect the country to be ranked first in terms of coffee consumption, but this is not the case. In Brazil, coffee is the national beverage, and the word for coffee is cafezinho (pronounced ca-fay-zee-nyo), which is nearly a synonym for “welcome” in the country’s dialect. Wherever you go, the moment you step into a coffee shop or into someone’s home, the first thing they will ask you is if you would like an acafezinho (coffee with sugar).

Here’s a recipe for cafezinho that has been passed down through the family for centuries.

  • Pour 1 tablespoon of espresso coffee into each cup of water and season with sugar to taste.

Instructions

  • Determine which saucepan you will use only for the purpose of brewing coffee. Fill the pan halfway with water, then add the sugar and stir until completely dissolved. Bring the water to a boil over medium heat. When the water and sugar combination comes to a boil, add the coffee powder and stir thoroughly before immediately removing it from the heat. This is a classic fabric coffee strainer that you may find. If you don’t have access to an actual filter, a paper filter will suffice. Fill a small cup (such as a demitasse) halfway with water
  • Set aside.

Obtain an iron skillet to be used just for the preparation of coffee; Fill the pan halfway with water, then add the sugar and stir until it is completely dissolved. Cook over medium heat, until the water comes to a boil. Immediately after bringing the water and sugar combination to a boil, add the coffee powder and stir thoroughly before immediately removing it from the heat. A typical cloth coffee strainer may be found at any thrift store. Alternatively, if you don’t have a genuine one, a paper filter will suffice.

ITALY

Let’s speak about Italy, and how coffee is such an important element of the country’s cultural heritage there. Every year, around eight million bags of green coffee beans are imported into Italy. Coffee is a favorite beverage among Italians. In their homes, they prepare coffee in a moka pot, and in cafés, restaurants, and places of business, they consume it from espresso coffee machines, which are distributed by hand. The drink is typically consumed while standing in line at cafés and is delivered in miniature espresso glasses.

COLOMBIA

In Colombia, coffee is more of a family affair, and it is typically consumed with breakfast. Coffee, on the other hand, is a beverage that may be enjoyed in cold weather, and despite the fact that Colombian coffee is considered to be among the best in the world, Colombia does not have a significant coffee culture. “Tinto is the most common type of coffee in our nation, which is essentially a long black. However, it is more customary to have coffee with milk for morning, which is referred to as a ‘latte’ in English.” Mr.

INDONESIA

While there are many lovely coffee shops scattered across Indonesia’s major cities, if you truly want to experience Indonesian coffee culture, it is best to get out on the streets and away from the shopping malls and shopping centers. Unstrained brewed coffee in a glass is the most popular brewed coffee in the nation, and you can find it in the warungs kopi (roadside stalls), which are little kiosks along the road.

Indonesians love to sip their coffee black, with a little of sugar added. Additionally, Indonesians serve coffee flavored with herbs and spices, such as Kopi Jahe, or ginger coffee. To create a cup of Kopi Tubruk, follow these steps:

  1. While there are many lovely coffee shops scattered across Indonesia’s major cities, if you really want to appreciate Indonesian coffee culture, it is best to get out on the streets and away from the shopping malls. Unstrained brewed coffee in a glass is the most popular brewed coffee in the country, and you can get it in the warungs kopi, roadside kiosks, where it is sold unfiltered. Drinking coffee black and with sugar is preferred among Indonesians. Javanese coffee is often served with herbs and spices, such as Kopi Jahe, or ginger coffee. To prepare a cup of Kopi Tubruk, follow these instructions:

GREECE

Drinking coffee is a social activity in Greece if you live there full time. It is similar to espresso in taste and appearance, but it cannot be consumed standing up because drinking coffee is supposed to be a relaxed and delightful experience. During the summer, the most popular beverage would be a frappé (), which is an iced coffee. In the video below, you can see how traditional Greek coffee is prepared. When it comes to getting together with family or friends and talking about anything and everything, coffee is the ideal excuse.

AUSTRALIA

Drinking coffee is a social activity in Greece if you reside there. However, unlike espresso, Greek coffee cannot be had while standing up because drinking coffee is intended to be a peaceful and delightful experience. An iced coffee frappé (), which is popular in the summer, is the most popular beverage. Watch the video below to learn how to make traditional Greek coffee. When it comes to getting together with family or friends and talking about anything and everything, coffee is the ideal excuse.

FINLAND

Finland is first in the world in terms of coffee consumption per capita. According to a research published by Nordic Coffee Culture, 6 percent of Finnish women and 14 percent of Finnish men consume more than 10 cups of coffee each day on average. Yes, it is a significant amount of coffee, and Finland appears to have a significant number of devoted coffee lovers! The typical person consumes four cups of coffee per day, therefore when someone consumes 10 cups of coffee per day, it is rather remarkable to witness.

As a result, Finland is the only country in the world where taking a coffee break is required by law, making it the only country in the world where taking a coffee break is mandatory.

If you prefer decaffeinated coffee, you may be out of luck in this case.

Thank you for taking the time to read our blog.

Coffee: Who grows, drinks and pays the most?

Getty Images is the source of this image. When you get up in the morning, how do you prefer your coffee? Everything from an Italian espresso to a Vietnamese ca phe trung, which is prepared with egg yolks and condensed milk, depends on where you wake up in the morning.

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, more people are consuming more coffee than ever before. So, which country provides the most quantity of the beans required for our daily caffeine fix? Who is the biggest coffee drinker, and where do they go to get their fix?

1. Top coffee producers

Coffee is one of the most popular beverages in the world, and it is manufactured in more than 50 different nations. Brazil is the world’s greatest producer of coffee beans. More than 51 million bags of beans were produced in the nation in 2017-18, according to official figures. Vietnam is the world’s second-largest producer of this product. In 2017-18, India, which is also one of the world’s major tea growers, produced 5.8 million 60kg bags of coffee, with the neighboring country of Sri Lanka producing 33,000 of those bags of coffee.

  • Among the main exports from Honduras is coffee, which generated more than 8.3 million bags last year and is one of the country’s most important commodities.
  • In accordance with the Fairtrade Foundation, more than 125 million people throughout the globe rely on coffee for their livelihoods, with over 25 million smallholder farms providing approximately 80 percent of the world’s coffee production.
  • Fairtrade coffee is also environmentally friendly.
  • Some experts suggest that farmers’ participation in the plan is too costly, and that this may outweigh any possible advantages.
  • However, according to Louisa Cox, director of impact at the Fairtrade Foundation, being fairtrade-certified also entitles farmers to receive training, safety equipment, and other forms of protection and assistance.

2. Who drinks the most?

According to figures from the International Coffee Organization, only two countries consume more than 10kg of coffee per person per year – Finland and Sweden – in terms of coffee consumption. The Finnish consume the most coffee per year, at 12.5kg per person. Several Nordic nations round out the top five, presumably in need of a cup of coffee to get through the chilly winter days. The world’s top ten coffee-consuming countries are all located in Europe, although the majority of the world’s greatest coffee producers are located in developing countries with ideal growing conditions for coffee.

The United States and the United Kingdom do not appear on the list of the top 20 coffee users, dropping below countries such as Croatia, France, and Lithuania.

3. Who pays the most?

The coffee supply chain is quite complicated. From producers to dealers, from processors to exporters, and eventually from roasters to retailers, beans go from one person to another. As a result, a fluctuation in the price of coffee can have significant implications for the pricing of coffee for farmers, producers, and consumers. According to the International Coffee Organization, buyers in the United Kingdom paid the highest price per pound of soluble coffee in 2016 -$16.29 (£11.45) per pound of soluble coffee.

Poles were the least expensive when it came to getting their daily fill of caffeine, paying $3.17 (£2.23).

4. Biggest brands

The supply chain for coffee is quite complicated. Beans are transferred from growers to dealers, then from processors to exporters, and ultimately from roasters to retail outlets. As a result, a change in the price of coffee can have significant implications for the pricing of coffee for farmers, producers, and consumers. According to the International Coffee Organization, buyers in the United Kingdom paid the highest price per pound of soluble coffee in 2016, paying $16.29 (£11.45) per pound.

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When it came to getting their daily fill of caffeine, Polish coffee drinkers paid the least, at $3.17 (£2.23).

5. Most popular coffee drinks

The coffee supply chain is a complicated web of connections. Beans are transferred from producers to dealers, then from processors to exporters, and lastly from roasters to retailers. As a result, a change in the price of coffee can have significant implications for growers, producers, and consumers. According to the International Coffee Organization, buyers in the United Kingdom paid the highest price per pound of soluble coffee in 2016 – $16.29 (£11.45) per pound of soluble coffee. Malta came in second at $13.33 (£9.37) per pound of roasted coffee, followed by Italy at $7.45 (£5.24) per pound of roasted coffee.

More on this story

Coffee consumption is comparable to that of the ordinary Finnish person, if you consume half a pound of coffee each week by yourself. Global coffee consumption by nation is estimated to be 26.45 pounds per capita per year, which is more than any other country in the world, according to WorldAtlas. And because that “per capita” figure includes children and other caffeine-free individuals, the actual amount spent by each coffee consumer is likely to be far higher. Despite the fact that Finland is the clear champion, its Scandinavian neighbors consume large quantities of bitter bean juice as well.

Europeans tend to consume more caffeine than anyone from any other continent; just five nations (Canada, Brazil, Cyprus, Lebanon, and the United States) are situated on any other continent, according to the study.

Due to the frequency with which Europeans consume coffee, it should come as no surprise that coffee has become a vital part of their culture in a variety of ways.

People in Sweden and the Netherlands have established a pattern for coffee time, similar to how inhabitants of the United Kingdom have established a traditional tea service, complete with scones, biscuits, and/or other pastries.

Afika is the Swedish word for a cup of tea; skoffietijd is the Dutch word for a day off. See which other nations made the cut in the table below, and learn more about their coffee traditions by visiting their respective websites.

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Which Country Drinks the Most Coffee? (Surprising!)

Aside from food, coffee is one of the few things that is actually universally popular in human culture. Despite geographical and cultural differences, there is a universal appreciation for coffee, which is brewed in largely the same way across the world. Different civilizations brew coffee in a variety of ways, yet the fascinating truth is that the fundamental characteristics of coffee are hauntingly identical around the world. However, despite the universal attraction of coffee and the global similarity of patterns in coffee consumption, one country must be the world’s largest user of the beverage.

If not the United States, then perhaps it is Europe, where it is impossible to stroll down any major city street without passing at least a half-dozen coffee shops.

Make your way to the coffee world tour with your flag in hand and a cup of coffee in hand.

Some Preliminaries

Image Credits: CC0 Public Domain, pxhere, CC0 Public Domain We need to get a few things straight first before we can start looking at the figures in detail. First and foremost, what exactly does it mean to be the one who “drinks the most coffee”? Larger nations would have an unfair edge if we totaled up the entire amount of coffee purchased in a year for every country. Simply because of their large populations, large countries such as the United States or China would outperform smaller ones such as the Netherlands.

  1. As a result, all countries, regardless of their population, are on an equal footing with one another.
  2. Sure, some people are coffee addicts who use five or more cups of the beverage every day, while others do not consume any.
  3. One final aspect to mention is that we will be comparing the amount of coffee consumed in a particular year.
  4. We are quite confident in this assumption, but it is one that should be kept in mind because the amount of coffee consumed in some nations may grow or decrease based on economic considerations.

Which country drinks the most coffee?

Image courtesy of: pixel2013 and pixabay. According to easily accessible figures from the International Coffee Organization, Finland is the world’s leading coffee consumer, consuming an average of little more than 12 kilograms of coffee per person each year. In an interesting turn of events, Sweden — another Nordic nation – comes in at number two, with almost 11 kg of food consumed per capita. Iceland, Norway, and Denmark round out the top five, continuing the trend established before. Perhaps the most straightforward explanation for the striking trend of cold-weather nations leading the way is that people want something to warm them up on chilly, Northern mornings, and coffee is the logical choice to provide that warmth.

A notable exception is that Italy, a nation that one might anticipate to be near or at the top of the list, does not even feature in the top ten, but does rank third on the list of countries with the most expensive coffee price per pound.

The United Kingdom did not even make the top ten, despite the fact that it – not coincidentally – boasts the most expensive coffee in the world.

This adds credence to the notion that nations with high import prices eat less coffee as a result of the higher price that consumers perceive when purchasing coffee.

Coffee production

Image Credits: CC0 Public Domain, pxhere, CC0 Public Domain The manufacture of coffee is another idea that is linked. With nearly a two-to-one advantage over second-place Vietnam, Brazil is the world’s leading producer of coffee. Colombia, Indonesia, and Honduras are ranked third through fifth, respectively, and Ethiopia was ranked sixth, just missing out on a spot in the top five. We were shocked to learn that Vietnam had such a high ranking, given that our local shop often sells coffee from Mexico, Peru, and Kenya.

It is interesting to note that nations with high coffee output are not always countries with high coffee consumption.

Due to the fact that coffee can only be cultivated in tropical climes, it is easy to explain why nations in Europe are unable to produce their own coffee.

Conclusion

Thanks to CC0 Public Domain, pxhere, for the image credit. Production of coffee, for example, is an associated notion. With nearly a two-to-one advantage over second-place Vietnam, Brazil is the world’s leading coffee producer. In the third through fifth places on the list comes Colombia, followed by Indonesia and Honduras, with Ethiopia coming in at number six, just missing out on a place in the top five. The fact that Vietnam ranked so high shocked us, considering that our local shop typically sells coffee from Mexico, Peru, and Kenya.

The fact that increased coffee output does not equate to high coffee consumption is noteworthy in this regard.

Due to the fact that coffee can only be cultivated in tropical climes, nations in Europe are unable to produce their own coffee.

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Which Country Drinks the Most Coffee : Top 10

All About Madagascar Coffee; Can Coffee Be Used as a COVID Detector? All About Madagascar Coffee Discoveries That Astounded You; How to Make Algerian Lemon Coffee; and More.

1. Finland is the Coffee-Drinking Capital of the World

All About Madagascar Coffee; Coffee as a COVID Detector? All About Madagascar Coffee Discoveries That Astounded You; How to Make Algerian Lemon Coffee; and More!

2. Norway is a Close Second for Coffee Consumption

Possibly it is the long, cold, and dark winters that the Nordic people have to suffer that make them so fond of coffee. Perhaps it is just due to their enthusiasm for the product. In any case, Norway is the second largest consumer in the world. A long and illustrious history of association with coffee may be traced back several centuries. However, like with Finland, it gained popularity after World War I, when prohibition hindered Norwegians from using alcoholic beverages. If you fast forward to the year 2021, you’ll discover that its popularity hasn’t waned in the least.

Whether it’s for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, and whether you live in the country or the city, you’ll certainly discover a cup of tea that’s just right for you. Coffee, sugar, and moonshine are all ingredients of a drink known as the ” karsk “.

3. Iceland Ranks Third for its Coffee Fans

Iceland is the next stop in our quest to find out which country consumes the most coffee in the world. It is not geographically part of Scandinavia – that distinction belongs to Norway, Sweden, and Denmark – but it is culturally and historically part of the area, in the same way that Finland is. On November 16, 1703, a man named rni Magnsson became the first person in Scandinavia to consume coffee, according to historical records. In recent years, Reykjavik, Iceland’s capital city, has become a haven for tiny, independent Coffee shops that are well-known and adored for their stimulating brews.

As a result, the country is the third-largest consumer of Java in the world.

4. Next is Denmark for Drinking Fresh Coffee

Denmark is the fourth Scandinavian country to appear on our list of countries with the highest coffee consumption, both culturally and geographically. When the Beans first appeared on the scene in 1665, it was precisely fifty years after they had originally arrived in Europe as a whole. More recently, in 2016, Denmark surpassed the United States to become the world’s happiest country, and it has remained in the top five of the list ever since. Coincidence? No, we don’t believe so. Denmark, which ranks fourth in the world in terms of coffee consumption, is eager to boil up a cup around mealtime, much like Finland, Norway, and Iceland.

Meanwhile, according to official figures, the country consumes 8.7kg (19.18lbs) of meat per inhabitant per year on average.

5. Fifth Place is Reserved for the Netherlands

Europe is unquestionably the place to be right now, as we have risen to fifth position in the ranking of countries that consume the most coffee. The Netherlands is the current holder. When the Dutch transported live coffee plants from Mocha, Yemen, in 1616, they made history as the first Europeans to accomplish this feat. Pieter van den Broecke was the mastermind behind the scheme, and he was responsible for ensuring that the bushes thrived throughout the Dutch territories of Java and Suriname.

However, in the Netherlands, the average person consumes 8.4kg (18.52lbs) of coffee per year, according to official statistics.

A cake is preferred as an accompaniment by those living in the northern hemisphere.

6. It Turns Out That Sweden Loves its Coffee Beans

For those of you who thought we were finished with Scandinavia, you’re in for a pleasant surprise. Sweden is in sixth place when it comes to determining which countries consume the most coffee. However, it wasn’t until the 1700s that consumption became fashionable among the affluent and powerful, and it was only then that consumption became widespread. However, the Swedish King Gustav III, who believed that coffee posed a threat to public health, outlawed the beverage completely. Following a fruitless attempt to keep the Swedes from consuming it, the prohibition was finally abolished in the 1820s.

The ordinary countryman or woman currently consumes 8.2kg (18lbs) of it each year on an annual basis. It is generally related with social contacts, particularly in metropolitan areas such as the Swedish capital of Stockholm, where it is prevalent.

7. Switzerland Comes in at Seventh Place

Even if you thought we’d finished with Scandinavia, you’re in for a pleasant shock. According to the results of a survey, Sweden is the sixth most frequent consumer of coffee in the world. Although consumption began in 1674, it was not until the 1700s that it became fashionable among the affluent and influential. However, the Swedish King Gustav III, fearing that coffee constituted a danger to the public’s health, outlawed the beverage completely. After failing to keep the Swedes from consuming it, the prohibition was finally abolished in the 1820s.

This substance currently weighs 8.2kg (18lbs) every year on average for the ordinary countryman or lady.

8. Belgium is a Nation of Coffee Loving People

Belgium is renowned for beer and waffles, but Switzerland is recognized for Gruyère, L’Etivaz, and Sbrinz – not to mention boxes packed with delectable delicacies – and Switzerland is known for cheese. Fresh coffee, on the other hand, is an important component of the culture, albeit one that is rather contentious. In its prior capacity as a colonial power in Africa, the country was able to meet its need for beans by cultivating them in Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Since then, much has changed, with Belgium and the rest of Europe being able to get coffee from ethical sources.

Belgians consume 6.8kg (15lbs) of alcohol per capita, per year, possibly with a side of those delectable waffles that have made them renowned all over the globe.

9. Save a Cup of Coffee for Luxembourg

We’ve arrived to the penultimate position in terms of which country consumes the most coffee. Luxembourg is currently in first place, much to the amazement of everyone (with the exception of Luxembourgers)! Despite the fact that the country is small, its passion for beer appears to have no bounds. Residents and visitors alike go to Luxembourg City and the surrounding region to get their energy fix, whether it’s through drip coffee or artisanal cocktails made with local ingredients. When did it initially come in the country, and how long ago was that?

You might be interested:  How Much Coffee Per Water? (Solved)

The typical local consumes 6.5kg (14.55lbs) of these Beans per year, per capita and per year.

So, Italy has earned the tenth and last position in the rankings, correct?

10. Oh, Canada, You Do Enjoy Your Coffee

Canada is the only non-European country to make the cut this year. Vancouver, British Columbia, and Halifax, Nova Scotia are just a few of the cities where Canadians can’t get enough of coffee. Some believe that it was none other than Captain John Smith, the English adventurer linked with Pocahontas, who brought it to the New World and established its presence there. Nevertheless, it is likely to be little more than a myth, given other historians believe coffee came far earlier. Despite the fact that the winter months can be extremely cold (temperatures can dip as low as -40°C), a cup of Joe is now considered to be an integral part of the culture.

While driving down the highway, you’ll be hard-pressed not to stumble across a Coffee house, which may sometimes be found just a few yards away from one another. From one year to the next, the average person consumes 6.2kg (13.66lbs) of sugar every year, according to statistics.

Summary of Coffee Consumption by Country

There you have it: our top-ten list of the countries with the highest coffee consumption. When it comes to countries in the rankings, Bosnia and Herzegovina comes in at number 11, Austria is at number 12, Italy (finally!) is at number 13, and Brazil is at number 14. The United States, on the other hand, does not appear until the twenty-fifth position. What about the United Kingdom? Not the 26th or the 27th, but the 45th! At least for the time being, tea reigns supreme. Also keep in mind that the rankings are always changing from year to year, which means that there might be a significant movement in the near future.

In any case – and regardless of where you are on the earth – you can rely on The Kent and Sussex Tea and Coffee Company to provide you with the highest-quality coffee beans available anywhere.

Infographic: The Countries Most Addicted to Coffee

The inhabitants of the Netherlands will consume the most amount of coffee this year. According to an estimate from the StatistaConsumer Market Outlook, the per capita consumption of coffee in the European country is expected to be 8.3 kg, making them the world’s most passionate consumers of a cup of hot brown. Immediately behind the Netherlands is a group of Nordic nations, consisting of Finland, Sweden, and Norway. Description The graph below depicts the per capita consumption of coffee in various countries throughout the world in 2020.

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Discover which European Countries Drink the Most Coffee

Coffee is included in many people’s morning routines all around the world because of its association with enhanced alertness and the presence of potent antioxidants. You may not be aware of the fact that Europe consumes more coffee than any other region. With the worldwide coffee market estimated at a whopping €86 billion, it’s a rich business to which many of us contribute on a daily basis—often without even realizing what we’re doing for a living. So, let’s delve a bit further and find out which European countries consume the most caffeine.

Europe’s biggest coffee drinkers—the data

In the period June 2020 to June 2021, Europeans consumed 242 million kg of coffee, according to the International Coffee Organization. When you include in the United Kingdom (21.8 million kgs) and Switzerland (9.3 million kgs), you get a mind-boggling total of 273 million kgs of coffee consumed. Considering that one kilogram of coffee makes around 130 single-shot coffees, the Europeans drank an astounding 35 billion cups of coffee each year! However, when it comes to determining which European nations consume the most coffee, there is a great deal of contradicting information available on the internet.

As a result, while we’ll be relying heavily on data provided by Statista because it’s the most up-to-date and reliable source available, it’s critical to interpret any conclusions with a grain of salt (or sugar).

Statista studied worldwide coffee consumption trends throughout the course of 2020 and classified their findings based on the kilograms of coffee eaten per capita (i.e., per person) they observed.

1. The Netherlands

The Dutch are the coffee maniacs of Europe, consuming an enormous 8.3kg of coffee per capita, with many of them consuming up to 4 cups a day on average. The Dutch are known for their slow Dutch brew, which is a brewing process in which ice-cold water is carefully dripped over freshly ground coffee for 3–12 hours. They eat a lot of coffee. and they’re not always ready to wait for it.

The Netherlands’ favorite way to drink coffee

Aside from their love of Dutch brew, the Dutch aren’t very choosy about their coffee, preferring instead a straightforward filter coffee, which they drink black rather than with milk. The ideal location to have a cup of coffee is in one of the numerous well-known coffee shops in the Netherlands, which are also known for selling other, more environmentally friendly ways to relax!

2. Finland

The Finnish consume an average of 7.8 kg of coffee per person per year, placing them in second position, albeit only by a slim margin. The Finns are a highly caffeinated people who, on average, consume between 3 and 5 cups of coffee per day and who drink coffee with each meal.

Finland’s favorite way to drink coffee

The Finnish favor a lighter filter coffee, with light roast coffee accounting for 80 percent of all coffee eaten in the country. Because the Finnish government has made it necessary for each employee to take two 10-minute coffee breaks over the course of a working day, the majority of coffee is consumed either at home or at the workplace.

3. Sweden

The ever-popular Swedish custom of “Fika,” which encourages people to gather and have a cup of coffee together, solidly places the Swedes in third place, with each person consuming 7.6 kg of coffee per year on the planet. Fika, which is similar to the British afternoon tea, originated when coffee was introduced to Sweden in the 18th century, but evolved into a more luxurious affair with the introduction of patisseries a century later!

Sweden’s favorite way to drink coffee

Swedish custom of “Fika,” which encourages people to gather and have a cup of coffee together, has solidified the country’s third-place ranking, with each individual consuming 7.6 kg of coffee year. Swedish afternoon tea (Fika) originated when coffee was brought to the country in the 18th century, but it evolved into a more decadent event with the introduction of patisseries a century later!

4. Norway

Norway is fourth in the world in terms of coffee consumption per person, with 80 percent of the population consuming between 4 and 5 cups per day. The Norwegians are dedicated about their coffee culture, as seen by their founding of the World Barista Championships. It has only been in the last two decades, however, that Norwegians have begun to consume coffee outside of their homes. Norway’s cities have a thriving coffee culture, thanks to the increasing popularity of coffee shops and the increasing number of people looking for an artisanally prepared cup of joe.

Norway’s favorite way to drink coffee

Making a cup of traditional Norwegian coffee (also known as a “kokekaffe,” which literally translates as “boiled coffee”) is as simple as heating water to a boil and steeping the coffee for a few minutes, just as you would make a cup of tea.

Because the process tends to highlight any defects that would be better disguised in a blended coffee, it is best to utilize single-origin coffee grinds when attempting this technique.

5. Germany

A typical Norwegian coffee, known as a ‘kokekaffe’ (literally, boiling coffee), is produced by bringing water to a boil and steeping the coffee for a few minutes, just like one would make a cup of tea, before straining it. Because the approach tends to highlight any defects that would be better disguised in a blended coffee, it is best to utilize single-origin coffee grinds when doing this.

Germany’s favorite way to drink coffee

Germans have been drinking less coffee since the reunification of East and West Germany in 1990, and this trend has continued until the mid-2000s. However, this began to alter from 2005, when novel techniques of brewing coffee, predominantly including the use of milk, were developed. Thus, normal filter coffee is now competing with a greater variety of milk-based coffee beverages, such as lattes, cappuccinos, and “milchkaffee,” among others.

6. Switzerland

Despite the fact that Switzerland is not formally a member of the EU, it is included on this list since it is still a part of the European single market, which includes the import and export of coffee. The Swiss consume 4.8 kg of coffee per capita, but their caffeine intake differs based on where they reside in Switzerland’s many linguistic regions, which is intriguing. German-speaking Swiss consumed 204 mg of caffeine per day, whereas French-speaking Swiss consumed 170 mg per day, and Italian-speaking Swiss consumed 136 mg per day, according to researchers at the University of Lausanne.

Switzerland’s favorite way to drink coffee

As a result of the country’s mix of cultures and languages (including Italian, French, Romansh and German), Switzerland has a diverse coffee culture. While filter coffee is generally considered to be too weak, since the 1980s, the Swiss have preferred to drink coffee in the form of a ‘caffè crema,’ which is effectively a lengthy espresso made with coarse ground coffee. This is because filter coffee is considered to be too weak.

7. Italy

It takes a lot of coffee for the Italians to be ranked 7th in the world, with 4.7 kg consumed per person and an average of 3 cups consumed each day. Italy’s coffee, which was introduced to the country in the 1500s, is often regarded as the gold standard for European coffee, owing to the country’s concern with blending the finest beans with the appropriate grinds and mix to produce faultless espresso.

Italy’s favorite way to drink coffee

The Italians consume a lot of coffee, ranking seventh in the world with 4.7 kg per person and an average of roughly 3 cups each day. Italy’s coffee, which was introduced to the country in the 1500s, is often regarded as the gold standard for European coffee, owing to the country’s concern with blending the finest beans with the appropriate grinds and mix to make faultless espresso.

8. Estonia

Estonian coffee culture is booming, as evidenced by the country’s ranking of eighth in the world, with 4.3 kg of coffee eaten per capita.

There is currently a significant market for speciality coffee in Estonia, thanks to the innovative entrepreneurship of coffee connoisseursVello Raul Leitham and Raimond Feil, who began experimenting with different beans at their café in the early 2000s and have since expanded their operations.

Estonia’s favorite way to drink coffee

When it comes to coffee, many Estonians prefer to drink it in a café, with milk, rather than at home. While many drink coffee at home in the morning, many prefer to sip it later in the day in a cafe.

9. Portugal

The typical Portuguese individual consumes 4.0 kg of coffee per year, ranking ninth on the list, and prefers to drink it at a café or restaurant rather than at home, though at-home consumption is on the rise. Following a hearty Portuguese lunch with a cup of coffee, which is one of the least costly cups of coffee in Europe, is a habit that helps to prevent the post-lunch activity slump.

Portugal’s favorite way to drink coffee

While most nations prefer 100% Arabica beans, the Portuguese prefer the denser, more powerful tastes of a slow-roasted Arabica and Robusta combination, which has a richer, more complex flavor profile. A coffee shot, similar to that consumed by the Italians, is preferred by the Portuguese; however, due to the thick nature of the coffee mix, it is frequently served with a glass of water as an accompaniment.

10. France

France comes in at number 10 on the list of Europe’s top ten coffee drinkers, consuming 3.4 kg of coffee per capita and seeing an increase in demand for speciality coffees in recent years. With a whopping 70% of the French having a coffee capsule machine, it should come as no surprise that France is one of the leading countries in Europe when it comes to coffee pod and capsule consumption. French people consume a substantial proportion of their coffee at home, although 35 percent of the population visits a café 4–5 times each week as a result of this phenomenon.

France’s favorite way to drink coffee

The French want their coffee strong, hot, and black, and they don’t mess about with it. Filter coffee, as well as milky coffee, is not a popular choice in this country. The French, on the other hand, prefer an espresso, which is occasionally followed by a cigarette. It’s just the way life is!

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