How Much Does Coffee Raise Blood Pressure? (Solution)

A review of 34 studies showed that 200–300 mg of caffeine from coffee — approximately the amount you’d consume in 1.5–2 cups — resulted in an average increase of 8 mm Hg and 6 mm Hg in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively (2).

How much does coffee raise blood pressure?

  • Research indicates that it may increase blood pressure for a short time after consumption. A review of 34 studies showed that 200–300 mg of caffeine from coffee — approximately the amount you’d consume in 1.5–2 cups — resulted in an average increase of 8 mm Hg and 6 mm Hg in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively ( 2 ).

Contents

Does drinking coffee raise blood pressure?

Caffeine may cause a short, but dramatic increase in your blood pressure, even if you don’t have high blood pressure. It’s unclear what causes this spike in blood pressure. The blood pressure response to caffeine differs from person to person.

How much does caffeine raise your blood pressure?

Caffeine and hypertension Research shows that consuming 2-4 cups of coffee (200-300mg of caffeine) produces a mean increase of 8.1mmHg in systolic blood pressure and 5.7mmHg in diastolic blood pressure. The changes in blood pressure are temporary, and everything returns to normal in 3-4 hours.

How long does it take for coffee to raise your blood pressure?

Typically, blood pressure changes occur within 30 minutes, peak in 1-2 hours, and may persist for more than 4 hours. Conclusions: Having a patient abstain from caffeine for 30 minutes prior to blood pressure monitoring is not adequate to avoid caffeine’s potential effects.

Will quitting coffee lower blood pressure?

Lower Blood Pressure If you cut caffeine, you skip this blood pressure bump and potential complications along with it.

Is decaf coffee OK for high blood pressure?

We conclude that in normotensive adults replacement of regular by decaffeinated coffee leads to a real but small fall in blood pressure. However, it remains to be established whether a mass switch from regular to decaffeinated coffee would significantly reduce the total incidence of hypertension-related disorders.

What time of day is BP highest?

Usually, blood pressure starts to rise a few hours before you wake up. It continues to rise during the day, peaking in midday. Blood pressure normally drops in the late afternoon and evening. Blood pressure is normally lower at night while you’re sleeping.

How can I bring my blood pressure down immediately?

If you have high blood pressure (hypertension), without any complications, the first thing to do is to calm down and lie flat. Leave aside the task you were engaged in and slowly start taking deep breaths. This stress-relieving technique helps to bring down the blood pressure to a certain extent.

Does drinking water help high blood pressure?

Keeping well hydrated by drinking six to eight glasses of water daily (even more if working in hot and humid conditions) is beneficial for the blood pressure. Keeping well hydrated by drinking six to eight glasses of water daily (even more if working in hot and humid conditions) is beneficial for the blood pressure.

How much caffeine is too much?

Healthy adults shouldn’t consume more than 400 milligrams (mg) of caffeine per day. That’s equal to about four 8-ounce cups of brewed coffee or 10 cans of cola. Teens should limit their caffeine intake to less than 100 mg per day (one 8-ounce cup of coffee or about two cans of cola).

Does anxiety cause high blood pressure?

Anxiety doesn’t cause long-term high blood pressure (hypertension). But episodes of anxiety can cause dramatic, temporary spikes in your blood pressure.

What happens when you stop drinking coffee for a month?

Those who stop consuming coffee have reported side effects like depression, anxiety, dizziness, flu-like symptoms, insomnia, irritability, mood swings, and sluggishness. Here’s the good news: you won’t feel this way forever.

Who should not take coffee?

No one food or drink will make or break your long-term health. Caffeinated coffee is not recommended for: People with arrhythmias (e.g. irregular heartbeat) People who often feel anxious.

Why you should quit coffee?

Summary

  • Caffeine can reduce the quality of your sleep.
  • After time, coffee doesn’t give you any more energy.
  • It’s healthy to beat the addiction of caffeine.
  • You can save a lot of money by quitting coffee.
  • Coffee can cause tooth decay and staining.
  • No more coffee shakes and trembles.

What caffeine does to blood pressure

Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D., Provides an Answer It is possible that caffeine will produce a brief but significant increase in your blood pressure, even if you do not have high blood pressure. It is yet unknown what is causing this increase in blood pressure. The reaction of the blood pressure to coffee varies from one individual to the next. Some studies believe that caffeine may interfere with the production of a hormone that keeps your arteries open. Those who believe that coffee causes your adrenal glands to generate more adrenaline, resulting in a rise in blood pressure, disagree.

Others who use caffeinated beverages on a daily basis acquire a tolerance to the stimulant.

If you have high blood pressure, see your doctor about whether you should reduce or discontinue the use of caffeinated beverages altogether.

In contrast, if you’re concerned about the impact of caffeine on your blood pressure, consider limiting your daily caffeine intake to 200 milligrams, which is about equal to the caffeine found in two 8-ounce (237-milliliter) cups of brewed coffee.

Also, if you have high blood pressure, avoid drinking coffee immediately before engaging in activities that naturally raise your blood pressure, such as exercise, weightlifting, or strenuous physical activity.

If your blood pressure rises by around 5 to 10 points, you may be more sensitive to the blood pressure-raising effects of coffee than the average person.

With Dr.

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  1. Acute effects of coffee intake on self-reported gastrointestinal symptoms, blood pressure, and stress indicators in healthy persons, Papakonstantinou E, et al. The Nutrition Journal, 2016
  2. 15:26
  3. And C. Xie and colleagues A comprehensive review and dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies were conducted to determine the association between coffee intake and the risk of hypertension. doi:10.1038/s41371-017-0007-0, published in the Journal of Human Hypertension in 2018. Giardina E-G. is an abbreviation for E-G. Caffeine and caffeinated drinks have been shown to have cardiovascular effects. De Giuseppe R, et al. (accessed May 6, 2021)
  4. De Giuseppe R, et al. A critical assessment of the relationship between caffeine and blood pressure. NRR (Nutrition Research Reviews) published a paper in 2019 with the doi:10.1017/S0954422419000015. Caffeine, herbal remedies, and other substances. Dietary Guidelines for Americans for the years 2020-2025, accessed on May 6, 2021. Departments of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture of the United States Accessed on May 6, 2021
  5. Temple JL, et al., “The safety of ingested caffeine: A thorough assessment,” published in The Journal of the American Medical Association. Frontiers in Psychiatry, vol. 8, no. 1, 2017
  6. Chrysant, S.G. What is the effect of coffee drinking on blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes? Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy, 2017
  7. Doi:10.1080/14779072.2017.1287563
  8. FoodData Central. Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy, 2017
  9. Doi:10.1080/14779072.2017.1287563 Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture. accessed on May 6, 2021
  10. Accessed on May 6, 2021

More Expert Answers may be found here.

Caffeine in Coffee: How Does It Affect Your Blood Pressure?

Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world. In reality, individuals all over the world eat close to 19 billion pounds (8.6 billion kg) of sugar every year on average (1). If you’re a coffee enthusiast, you’re undoubtedly already familiar with the “coffee buzz,” which occurs just after taking your first few swallows of the beverage. Even the smell of the flowers might start to make you feel better. The question of whether daily coffee drinking is truly beneficial to your health has been debated, particularly in light of its influence on blood pressure and heart health.

  1. According to scientific evidence, the physiological benefits of drinking coffee can last longer than just a brief burst of alertness.
  2. Following an analysis of 34 studies, researchers discovered that drinking 200–300 mg of caffeine from coffee — around the amount you’d take in 1.5–2 cups — resulted in an average elevation of 8 mm Hg and 6 mm Hg in a person’s blood pressure, respectively, on average (2).
  3. However, daily coffee drinking does not have the same effect on blood pressure as occasional coffee use – this may be related to the caffeine tolerance that develops when you consume coffee on a regular basis (2).
  4. SummaryAccording to research, drinking coffee might cause blood pressure to rise for up to three hours after it is consumed.
  5. Although coffee has been shown to momentarily raise your blood pressure immediately after drinking it, this impact does not appear to last for very long after consuming it.
  6. In reality, there may be some health benefits to drinking coffee.
  7. In coffee, there are a number of bioactive chemicals that are known to have powerful antioxidant properties and may help to lower oxidative stress in the body ( 4 , 5 ).

More study, however, is required to have a better understanding of how coffee impacts human health over the long term.

SummaryAlthough long-term research is limited, some evidence suggests that drinking coffee on a regular basis does not raise the risk of high blood pressure or heart disease.

When it comes to the vast majority of people, moderate coffee drinking is unlikely to have a substantial impact on blood pressure or the risk of developing heart disease – even if you have already been diagnosed with high blood pressure.

A number of the bioactive substances found in coffee may be beneficial to one’s health, including the reduction of oxidative stress and inflammation (2, 4 , 5 ).

In the case that you do not currently consume coffee on a daily basis, you may want to wait until your blood pressure is under control before including this beverage into your routine, since it has been shown to temporarily raise blood pressure.

It is critical to maintain a healthy balance in your lifestyle and food habits at all times.

Being more concerned with these sorts of healthy behaviors is probably a better way to spend your time and effort than being excessively worried about your coffee consumption.

It is likely that maintaining a balanced diet and leading a healthy lifestyle will have a greater influence on blood pressure than caffeine usage.

According to research, drinking coffee may cause a short-term elevation in blood pressure levels.

Coffee, on the other hand, may be beneficial to heart health because of its high antioxidant content. Despite the fact that further study is needed, it is likely that drinking coffee in moderation is a harmless habit for the majority of individuals.

Does coffee raise blood pressure, and should I drink it regularly?

The research on coffee and blood pressure has produced inconsistent results. However, research appears that the frequency with which a person consumes coffee may have an impact on its effect on blood pressure. In this article, we discuss how coffee impacts blood pressure and what the data says about the subject matter. We also talk about whether it’s appropriate to consult a doctor and provide several alternatives to coffee. Pin it to your Pinterest board. Moderate coffee drinking has been shown to have a neutral or favorable effect on hypertension in certain individuals.

  1. Caffeine exerts its effects on the body through interacting with several receptors in the nervous system.
  2. Because the research to far has been equivocal, the advantages and hazards of drinking coffee continue to be a source of controversy.
  3. According to an analysis published in 2017, increased coffee intake is connected with a slight reduction in hypertension (high blood pressure).
  4. According to the same research, beneficial chemicals found in coffee, such as phenols, may have a protective impact on the body.
  5. According to the findings of a 2017 analysis, persons with high blood pressure should consume coffee with prudence, but they do not need to abstain from doing so.
  6. A research conducted in 2016 on 40 healthy frequent coffee users discovered that all forms of coffee elevated blood pressure, but that the levels remained within healthy ranges throughout the trial.
  7. According to certain study, the amount of coffee consumed impacts the effects of the beverage on one’s blood pressure level.
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Another study discovered that drinking more than three cups of coffee per day on a regular basis did not raise the chance of developing hypertension.

Due to the fact that coffee includes a variety of other chemicals in addition to caffeine, it is possible that additional substances are responsible for its effects on blood pressure.

Some people report that drinking coffee leads them to have sleeplessness, anxiety, or tremors.

Anyone who gets these symptoms as a result of drinking coffee should abstain from doing so.

As a result, if individuals want to minimize their intake, they should start by reducing the amount of cups they drink each day.

But they came to the conclusion that regular use of caffeine in amounts of up to 300 milligrams per day is harmless, and may even be beneficial in the prevention of cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

Some coffee substitutes include caffeine, whilst others are inherently caffeine-free in their natural state. People can attempt the following:

  • Chicory coffee, dandelion root coffee, rooibos tea, yerba mate, toasted barley or grain beverages are all examples of alternative caffeine sources.

If someone is experiencing worrying symptoms after drinking coffee, they may desire to consult with a medical professional. Those who observe a rise in their blood pressure should seek medical attention immediately. People with high blood pressure may be able to consume coffee, according to research, as long as they exercise caution. Coffee consumers who consume the beverage on a regular basis may develop a tolerance to its physiological effects, whilst those who consume it less often may suffer a rise in their blood pressure.

People should, however, be aware of their own tolerance for coffee as well as how their bodies react to caffeine.

Habitual coffee consumption and blood pressure: an epidemiological perspective

The current epidemiological data on coffee drinking in connection to blood pressure (BP) and the risk of developing hypertension is summarized in this article. In cross-sectional research, the results reveal an inverse linear or U-shaped relationship between regular coffee consumption and blood pressure in diverse groups. Prospective studies have found that a high coffee intake (4 or more cups per day) may have a protective effect against hypertension, particularly in women. Aside from that, coffee abstainers may have a decreased chance of developing hypertension.

When it comes to the underlying biological processes, the majority of the study has been focused on the blood pressure-raising effects of caffeine.

However, although the exact nature of the relationship between coffee and blood pressure is still unknown, the majority of research shows that frequent use of caffeinated coffee does not raise the risk of developing hypertension.

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  • 103(1):210-7. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.115.120147. Epub 2015 Dec 9. Published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. PMID: 26657046 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Download a complimentary copy of the PMC article Short-term effects of espresso coffee on heart rate variability and blood pressure in habitual and non-habitual coffee consumers-a randomized crossover trial. Zimmermann-Viehoff F, Thayer J, Koenig J, Herrmann C, Weber CS, Deter HC. Zimmermann-Viehoff F, Thayer J, Koenig J, Herrmann C, Weber CS, Deter HC. F. Zimmermann-Viehoff and colleagues Nutr Neurosci. 2015 Apr 7
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References

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  3. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1983
  1. L.F. Andersen, D.R. Jacobs, Jr., M.H. Carlsen, et al. According to the Iowa Women’s Health Study, coffee consumption is connected with a lower risk of mortality due to inflammatory and cardiovascular illnesses. In 2006, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published an article titled Am J Clin Nutr 83:1039–46. -PubMed
  1. Am J Hypertens. 1999
  2. 12:934–45. Beilin LJ, Puddey IB, Burke V. The relationship between lifestyle and hypertension. -PubMed
  1. Bonita, J.S., Mandarano, M., Shuta, D., and colleagues Coffee and cardiovascular disease are two topics that have come up recently. In vitro, cellular, animal, and human research have all been conducted. Pharmacol Research, volume 55, pages 187–98. -PubMed
  1. Burke, V., Beilin, L., German, R., and colleagues Study of the association between lifestyle and personality factors and blood pressure and hypertension in the elderly: a cross-sectional investigation 1992
  2. 45:1061–70. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology -PubMed

Does drinking coffee affect your blood pressure?

The authors (Burke, Beilin, German, and colleagues) have published a paper entitled A cross-sectional research of the elderly found a link between lifestyle and personality factors and blood pressure and hypertension. 1061–70 in the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology (JCE). -PubMed;

How much caffeine can you drink a day?

It is recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that individuals consume no more than 400 milligramsof caffeine per day. An typical cup of coffee has 80 to 100 milligramsof caffeine, while a can of caffeinated soft drink contains 30 to 40 milligrams of caffeine. Coffee, according to a study of 34 research, may cause your blood pressure to rise, especially if you are not a frequent coffee user on a daily basis. According to the findings of the analysis, drinking anywhere between 200 and 300 milligrams of caffeine will raise your systolic blood pressure by 8 millimeters of mercury while raising your diastolic blood pressure by 6 millimeters of mercury.

Caffeine, on the other hand, will typically only boost blood pressure levels for around 3 hours.

Are there any long-term effects?

Given that coffee is a beverage that many people consume on a daily basis and that it does have a short-term influence on blood pressure, the subject of whether or not drinking coffee has any long-term consequences is a reasonable one to consider. It appears that the results are contradictory. According to some studies, drinking coffee on a daily basis has no long-term effect on your blood pressure and does not appear to raise your chance of developing cardiovascular disease. Other research shows that caffeine might cause undesirable side effects such as caffeine withdrawal, fast pulse, anxiety, or jitteriness in certain people.

One strategy to take coffee in a healthy manner is to never drink it on an empty stomach; instead, you should have at least a small meal before your morning coffee.

Staying on top of your health

The fact that coffee is a beverage that many people consume on a regular basis and that it does have a short-term influence on blood pressure raises the question of whether or not consuming coffee has any long-term consequences. Inconsistent findings were obtained. According to some research, drinking coffee on a daily basis has no long-term effect on your blood pressure and does not appear to raise your chance of developing cardiovascular disease. Other research shows that caffeine might cause undesirable side effects such as caffeine withdrawal, fast heartbeat, anxiety, or jitteriness, among other things, If you’re thinking about drinking coffee every day, it’s crucial to remember to do so in moderation and experiment with several types of coffee to see which one works best for you, your body, and your way of living.

Instead, take at least a small meal before drinking your morning cup of coffee.

Coffee Doesn’t Cause High Blood Pressure

26th of March, 2002 – Although drinking a cup of coffee a day may cause your blood pressure to slightly rise, it will not increase your chances of developing high blood pressure in the long run. An association between high blood pressure and coffee consumption has been discussed for decades, according to the authors of a new study, but no studies have been conducted to confirm this association. Previous research has shown that coffee temporarily raises blood pressure immediately after consumption, but that the body quickly adjusts to this effect and the effect disappears.

During a 33-year period, researchers tracked the coffee consumption and blood pressure of a group of male medical school graduates, according to the findings of this study, which appeared in the Archives of Internal Medicine on March 25.

Individuals who did not consume coffee were found to be less likely than coffee drinkers to have high blood pressure, but there was no evidence of a progressive increase in risk with increasing levels of coffee consumption, according to the research team.

As an example, filtering boiled coffee through a paper filter eliminates compounds that have been shown to raise cholesterol levels.

The authors point out that previous research has shown that ceasing coffee consumption can lower blood pressure in people who already have high blood pressure, and that the findings of this study may not be applicable to this particular group of individuals.

Coffee consumption and blood pressure

However, although the exact nature of the association between coffee and blood pressure is still unknown, the evidence to date shows that frequent use of caffeinated coffee does not raise the risk of developing hypertension. According to the findings of a 2008 analysis, data from cross-sectional studies reveal an inverse linear or U-shaped connection between habitual coffee consumption and blood pressure in different groups 33. According to the authors, prospective studies have shown that coffee consumption (4 or more cups per day) has a preventive impact against hypertension, which is more common in women.

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The same study also discovered that coffee use of roughly 5 cups per day, which is generally of short duration (1-12 weeks), may induce a slight increase in blood pressure (1-2mmHg) when compared to abstention or the use of decaffeinated coffee, according to randomised controlled studies.

  • According to a 2011 evaluation of five studies, the administration of 200-300mg caffeine resulted in a mean rise of 8.1mmHg in systolic blood pressure (BP) and a mean increase of 5.7mmHg in diastolic blood pressure (BP). The rise in blood pressure was detected within the first hour after coffee consumption and continued for a total of three hours. However, in tests conducted over a two-week period, no elevation in blood pressure was detected following the use of coffee. The scientists came to the conclusion that caffeine consumption can cause a short-term elevation in blood pressure in hypertensive persons. Current evidence does not indicate a relationship between long-term coffee drinking and elevated blood pressure, nor does it show an association between regular coffee consumption and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in hypertensive individuals. 34
  • When the risk of hypertension was measured in 172,567 participants and 37,135 incident cases, the results revealed an inverted J-shaped curve, with the risk of developing high blood pressure increasing up to 3 cups per day and reducing with larger intakes. A large prospective study concluded that neither caffeinated coffee nor caffeine intake was associated with mean systolic or diastolic blood pressure, but decaffeinated coffee intake was associated with mean systolic blood pressure 35
  • However, a slightly elevated risk appeared to be associated with light-to-moderate consumption of 1-3 cups per day 36
  • And a large prospective study concluded that neither caffeinated coffee nor caffeine intake was associated with mean systolic or dia It was shown that consumption of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and caffeine did not increase the incidence of incident hypertension in the study. Caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and caffeine are not associated with hypertension in postmenopausal women, according to the findings of this study. Caffeinated coffee was shown to be related with a considerable rise in blood pressure when compared to decaffeinated coffee, according to a 2012 research that looked at the variability in the effect of caffeine intake on blood pressure. In their paper, the authors speculated that genetic polymorphisms in the adenosine A2A receptors and the 2-adrenergic receptors might be responsible for some of the variability in the acute blood pressure response to coffee 37. According to the findings of a 2017 dose–response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies, higher coffee intake is related with a slight reduction in the risk of hypertension in prospective cohort studies, according to the authors. The presence or absence of smoking may have an effect modulator on the connection between coffee intake and the risk of hypertension 38. A study of 13,374 individuals from the Spanish SUN Project found an inverse association between regular coffee consumption and the risk of hypertension in women, with the association being strongest among women who had a suboptimal food pattern, particularly a low level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet 39. A further dose-response meta-analysis found a significant protective effect of coffee consumption on hypertension starting at the consumption of three cups of coffee per day. Consumption of coffee, according to a systematic review and data analysis conducted in 2018, which included 243,869 individuals and 58,094 incident instances of hypertension, was shown to be inversely linked with the incidence of hypertension in a dose–response way. When compared to persons who did not consume any coffee, the risk of developing hypertension was lowered by 3 percent, 5 percent, 8 percent, and 10 percent for those who consumed 2, 4, 6, and 8 cups/day, respectively 41. In a study published in 2018, researchers examined the relationship between coffee intake and blood pressure in relation to the prevalence of a nucleotide polymorphism linked with the risk of high blood pressure (NUP). Conclusion: Those who consume more than three cups of coffee per day were shown to have a statistically significant interaction effect between their coffee intake and their hereditary risk of high blood pressure, according to the scientists. The field of research is new, and additional examination is needed before any conclusions can be reached 42.

This material is meant for audiences that are members of the healthcare profession. Please think about the environment before printing anything.

Does caffeine cause high blood pressure?

Caffeine is one of the most extensively used natural stimulants in the world, accounting for around a quarter of all consumption. It is often found in beverages such as coffee, tea, chocolate, certain sodas, and energy drinks. Short-term increases in blood pressure (BP) can occur immediately following the use of caffeine and for a short period of time afterwards. Caffeine has a stimulating effect on the central nervous system and the brain. It works by blocking the adenosine receptors, which prevents sleepiness.

Adenosine receptors are blocked, and some neurotransmitters are increased, which contributes to the short-term increase in blood pressure that may occur after consuming coffee.

Some people, however, will continue to experience an elevation in their blood pressure even after being exposed to coffee for an extended period of time.

How quickly does caffeine increase blood pressure?

Caffeine normally has an influence on blood pressure after 30 minutes of administration, with the maximal effect happening 1-2 hours after consumption, when caffeine levels are at their maximum. It might take anywhere from 3-6 hours for caffeine levels in your system to drop by half. Caffeine-induced alterations in blood pressure have been shown to linger for more than 4 hours.

How much does caffeine increase blood pressure?

When the systolic pressure is less than 120 mm Hg and the diastolic pressure is less than 80 mm Hg, the blood pressure is deemed normal.

According to the findings of one study, drinking around five cups of coffee per day resulted in a 1-2 mm Hg elevation in blood pressure. Caffeine consumption has also been shown to cause increases in blood pressure of between 3-15 mm Hg systolic and 4-13 mm Hg diastolic, according to studies.

What is high blood pressure or hypertension?

The force of blood pressing against the walls of arteries (blood vessels) as it is pushed across the body by the heart causes blood pressure to rise. The results of blood pressure measurements are provided as two figures. The first number is the systolic pressure, which is the pressure in your arteries when your heart beats. The second number is the diastolic pressure. It’s important to note that the second figure is diastolic pressure, which is the pressure that exists in your arteries while your heart is at rest between beats.

Chronic high blood pressure, often known as hypertension, is a persistent rise in pressure that causes the heart to work harder and causes damage to the blood vessels in the body.

While caffeine consumption has been shown to induce a short-term elevation in blood pressure, it is not widely believed to enhance the risk of developing high blood pressure.

Bottom line

  • Caffeine might induce a temporary elevation in your blood pressure
  • Nevertheless, it is not harmful. Consult with your healthcare practitioner to determine what amount of caffeine consumption is appropriate for you to maintain. Please inform any health-care practitioner about any caffeine you have had recently if your blood pressure needs to be monitored.

References

  1. Mort JR, Kruse HR, and colleagues Caffeine consumption has an effect on the timing of blood pressure measurements. Journal of Pharmaceutical Education and Research. 2008
  2. 42(1):105-110. Geleijnse JM, doi:10.1345/aph.1K337
  3. Geleijnse JM An epidemiological viewpoint on the relationship between habitual coffee intake and blood pressure. Health Risk Management in Vascular Health, 4(5):963-970, 2008. doi:10.2147/vhrm.s3055
  4. Coffee and good health go hand in hand. The relationship between coffee drinking and blood pressure
  5. A study by Lovallo and colleagues (Lovallo and colleagues, Wilson and colleagues, Vincent and colleagues, Sung and colleagues, McKey and colleagues, Whitsett and colleagues). After only a few weeks of frequent caffeine usage, the blood pressure response to caffeine demonstrates partial tolerance. 434-765 in Hypertension, 2004
  6. 43(4):760-765 Nurminen ML, Niittynen L, Korpela R, Vapaatalo H. doi:10.1161/01.HYP.0000120965.63962.93
  7. Nurminen ML, Niittynen L, Korpela R, Vapaatalo H. A review of the relationship between coffee, caffeine, and blood pressure. Eur J Clin Nutr 1999
  8. 53(11):831-839. Eur J Clin Nutr 1999
  9. 53(11):831-839. World Health Organization (Hypertension. The American Heart Association has further information. What is high blood pressure and how does it affect you? The 31st of October, 2016. The American Heart Association has further information. Blood Pressure Readings: What You Should Know. Available at the following locations:

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Disclaimer of Medical Importance

Does Caffeine Increase Blood Pressure?

Caffeine is a natural stimulant that may be found in the nuts, berries, and leaves of a variety of plants, among other places. In the United States, caffeine is most typically eaten in the form of coffee or tea drinks; in fact, some experts believe that these beverages are the most extensively consumed meals in the world. Image courtesy of Vision SRL / Photodisc / Getty Images Because caffeine is so widely consumed across all human civilizations, a significant amount of study has been conducted to determine the health implications of caffeine consumption.

What Are Stimulants?

In order to stimulate the activity of the central nervous system, stimulants must be taken in large doses. This is why they cause you to feel more awake, focused, and alert after taking them. Increased physical activity, on the other hand, can produce blood vessel constriction, which can raise blood pressure and change the blood flow to the heart, among other things. Most harmful consequences of powerful stimulants like as cocaine and methamphetamine, on the other hand, are a direct result of their activity on blood vessels and the heart, as previously stated.

Caffeine, on the other hand, is a fairly moderate stimulant with a very short half-life in the body. As a self-limiting stimulant, caffeine works by stimulating the kidneys to excrete more caffeine at a faster pace than the body can produce it.

Caffeine, Blood Pressure, and the Heart

Evidence has consistently demonstrated that caffeine use does not raise the risk of developing high blood pressure, heart disease, or a coronary artery disease. One well-known study investigated more than 85,000 women over a ten-year period and discovered that there was no elevated risk of these illnesses in women who drank more than six cups of coffee per day, even in those who drank more than six cups of coffee per day. The Joint National Committee on Hypertension has declared unequivocally that there is no evidence to suggest a relationship between coffee/tea consumption and high blood pressure.

For example, one widely cited study discovered that respondents’ blood pressure increased slightly practically immediately after ingesting a caffeinated beverage, and that this blood pressure increase was more significant in persons who already had high blood pressure.

The study also revealed that drinking a caffeinated beverage resulted in a reduction in blood pressure in around 15% of participants who already had high blood pressure.

  • The changes in blood pressure caused by caffeine were minor and short-lived
  • Nonetheless, In contrast to popular belief, caffeine does not contribute to the abnormalities of the blood arteries that are linked with high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease

According to one fascinating study, the link between coffee and blood pressure may be more convoluted than previously thought. The researchers looked at how the amount of coffee drunk influenced the likelihood of getting high blood pressure in the participants. While the findings revealed that people who do not consume any coffee are at the lowest risk of developing high blood pressure, they also revealed that those who consume large amounts of coffee are at almost the same risk. In a surprising turn of events, persons who consumed just little amounts of coffee (1-3 cups per day) appeared to be at the greatest risk of developing cancer.

Health Benefits

In fact, there may be several health benefits to drinking coffee and tea. Even while green tea has long been recognized as a beneficial source of vitamins and antioxidants, recent study has revealed that darker liquids such as black tea and coffee may actually be better for you than their green counterpart. These dark beverages contain a rich source of substances known as polyphenols, which have been shown to be protective against heart disease as well as numerous forms of cancer. Some studies, for example, have repeatedly found that males who consume coffee had a lower chance of developing liver cancer than those who do not.

Polyphenols have also been proven to reduce the level of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the body, which is a crucial element in the inflammatory process.

Despite the fact that polyphenols are abundant in coffee and tea, other forms of polyphenols may be found in a variety of foods. All polyphenols have been demonstrated to have health advantages, but the most beneficial ones, aside from those found in coffee and tea, appear to be the following ones:

  • Grape polyphenols, apple polyphenols, chocolate polyphenols (dark chocolate containing more than 80% cacao), and other polyphenols are available.
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If you are a coffee or tea drinker, the scientific data should provide you with comfort; but, this does not imply that you should begin drinking coffee or tea because of the possible health advantages. A well-balanced diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables is also a fantastic source of polyphenols and polyphenol-related chemicals, as well as other antioxidants. Thank you for sharing your thoughts! Thank you for taking the time to join up. There was a clerical error. Please try your search again.

Read about oureditorial process to discover more about how we fact-check our information and ensure that it is accurate, dependable, and trustworthy.

  1. The authors are Marx B., Scuvée E., Scuvée-moreau., Seutin V and Jouret F. The mechanisms of caffeine-induced diuresis have been studied. Willett WC, Stampfer MJ, Manson JE, and colleagues (2016). Med Sci.2016
  2. 32(5):485-90. doi:10.1051/medsci/20163205015
  3. Women’s coffee intake and the risk of coronary heart disease A ten-year follow-up was conducted. JAMA. 1996
  4. 275(6):458-62. doi:10.1001/jama.1996.03530300042038
  5. Bai K, Cai Q, Jiang Y, Lv L. JAMA. 1996
  6. 275(6):458-62. doi:10.1001/jama.1996.03530300042038. A meta-analysis of eleven epidemiological studies found a link between coffee drinking and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Onco Targets Ther. 2016
  7. 9:4369-75. doi:10.2147/OTT.S109656
  8. Tressera-rimbau A, Arranz S, Eder M, Vallverda-queralt A. Onco Targets Ther. 2016
  9. Tressera-rimbau A, Arranz S, Eder M, Vallverda-queralt A Prevention of Stroke by Dietary Polyphenols 2017
  10. 2017:7467962. doi:10.1155/2017/7467962
  11. Del rio D, Rodriguez-mateos A, Spencer J, Tognolini M, Borges G, Crozier A. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2017
  12. 2017:7467962. doi:10.1155/2017/7467962. Dietary (poly)phenolics and human health: their structural characteristics, bioavailability, and evidence of preventive benefits against chronic disorders doi:10.1089/ars.2012.4581
  13. Antioxidant Redox Signal. 2013
  14. 18(14):1818-92

supplementary readings

  • Bravi, F., et al., Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis. Hepatology 46(2):430-5 (2007, February). Hartley, T., et al., “Hypertension Risk Status and Effect of Caffeine on Blood Pressure.” Hypertension Research and Treatment. Hemodynamic Hypertension 2000
  • 36(1): 137-41. Coffee and tea consumption and the risk of myocardial infarction, according to Howard et al. American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 149, no. 7, 1999, p. 162-7. A. Steptoe and colleagues Chronic tea use has been shown to increase platelet activation and inflammation, according to a double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Atherosclerosis, vol. 193, no. 2, pp. 277-82 (2007a). Uiterwaal, C.S., and colleagues. Coffee Consumption and the Incidence of Hypertension. Vlachopoulos, CV et al., Effect of Chronic Coffee Consumption on Aortic Stiffness and Wave Reflections in Hypertensive Patients, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 85, no. 3, p. 718-723, 2007. 61(6):796-802 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2007.

High blood pressure (hypertension) – Prevention

Eat healthfully, maintain a healthy weight, engage in regular exercise, consume alcohol in moderation, and abstain from smoking are all effective ways to prevent or lower high blood pressure in many cases.

Healthy diet

Reduce the amount of salt you put in your diet and consume a lot of fruits and vegetables to help you lose weight. Using the Eatwell Guide, you may learn about the numerous types of foods that make up our diet, as well as the quantities we should consume them in in order to maintain a well-balanced and healthy eating pattern. Salt has the effect of raising your blood pressure. The greater the amount of salt you consume, the higher your blood pressure will be. Aim to consume less than 6g (0.2oz) of salt each day, which is equal to around a teaspoonful of sodium.

Eating a low-fat diet that is high in fiber, such as wholegrain rice, bread, and pasta, as well as plenty of fruits and vegetables, can help to decrease blood pressure as well as other health problems.

Find out how to get your 5 a Day in on this page.

Limit your alcohol intake

Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol on a regular basis might cause your blood pressure to rise over time. Maintaining your blood pressure within the prescribed ranges is the most effective strategy to lower your chances of getting high blood pressure:

  • Men and women are encouraged not to consistently consume more than 14 units of alcohol per week
  • If you consume more than 14 units of alcohol per week, spread your consumption across three days or more.

Find out how many units are in your favorite beverage and how to reduce the number of units consumed. The consumption of alcohol is also heavy in calories, which will cause you to gain weight as well as raise your blood pressure even more. Find out how many calories are in some of your favorite beverages.

Lose weight

Being overweight makes it necessary for your heart to work harder in order to pump blood throughout your body, which can result in elevated blood pressure. With the BMI healthy weight calculator, you can determine whether or not you need to reduce weight. Even if you do need to shed a few pounds, it’s important to realize that even a little reduction in weight may have a significant impact on your blood pressure and general health. Find out how to lose weight in a safe manner.

Get active

Being physically active and engaging in regular exercise helps to decrease blood pressure by maintaining the health of your heart and blood vessels. Regular physical activity can also assist you in losing weight, which will in turn assist you in lowering your blood pressure. A minimum of 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise per week, such as cycling or rapid walking, should be completed by adults on a weekly basis.

Sport, walking, and gardening are all examples of physical exercise that may be undertaken. Find out more about ways to be more physically active.

Cut down on caffeine

It is possible that drinking more than 4 cups of coffee every day could raise your blood pressure. Reduce your intake of coffee, tea, and other caffeinated beverages such as cola and other energy drinks, if you are a huge lover of these beverages. It is OK to have tea and coffee as part of a well-balanced diet, but it is critical that these beverages do not serve as your primary or only source of fluid.

Stop smoking

Although smoking does not directly cause high blood pressure, it does put you at a significantly increased risk of having a heart attack or having a stroke. When you smoke, your arteries constrict as a result of the same factors that create high blood pressure. In the event that you smoke and have high blood pressure, your arteries will narrow considerably more quickly, increasing your likelihood of developing heart or lung disease in the future significantly. Seek assistance in quitting smoking.

The next review is scheduled for October 23, 2022.

Seven things to eat or avoid to lower your blood pressure

Professor Clare Collins, Associate Professor Tracy Burrows, and Dr Tracy Schumacher are the authors of this article. High blood pressure is sometimes referred to as the “silent killer.” This is due to the fact that it exhibits no symptoms. Heart disease, stroke, heart failure, and renal disease are all increased risks if you have high blood pressure (hypertension). Australian adults with high blood pressure – 140/90 millimetres of mercury (mmHg) or above – or who are taking medication for it account for a third of the population (34%).

  • Perhaps it’s no surprise that heart disease and stroke directly cost the Australian economy A$7.7 billion per year on average.
  • High blood pressure may be managed or avoided if taken care of.
  • Avoiding salt, liquorice, caffeine, and alcoholic beverages is also recommended.
  • Lowering your blood pressure by 1-2 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) can have a significant influence on lowering your risk of heart disease and stroke, as well as the nation’s health-care expenses.

What to eat to lower your blood pressure

Approximately 400 healthy adults participated in a review that included five research trials that examined the impact of oats on systolic blood pressure (the first blood pressure number, which represents the pressure at which the heart pumps blood) and diastolic blood pressure (the second number, which represents the pressure at which the heart relaxes). According to the findings of the study, individuals who consumed around 60 grams of rolled oats (a packed half-cup raw oats) or 25 grams of oat bran per day had 2.7 millimeters of mercury lower and 1.5 millimeters of mercury lower than those who did not consume these amounts.

There was an additional 0.11 mmHg drop in diastolic blood pressure for every additional one gram of total daily fiber consumed.

While part of the effects of fiber are attributable to weight reduction, when soluble fibers are digested in the large intestine, they form bioactive compounds.

These have a direct effect on lowering blood pressure. To lower your blood pressure, consume rolled oats or oat bran for breakfast, incorporate them into meat patties, or use them in recipes that call for breadcrumbs to help thicken the mixture.

Beetroot

Beetroot contains a chemical known as inorganic nitrate, which is extraordinarily high in concentration. During digestion, this is turned into nitric oxide, which induces the dilation of the blood vessels in the body. This has a direct effect on lowering the pressure in them. Drinking beetroot juice was shown to be related with a 4.4 mmHg drop in systolic blood pressure, according to a study of 16 studies involving predominantly healthy young males. However, there was no difference in diastolic blood pressure.

The males were randomly randomized to consume 250ml (one cup) of beetroot juice everyday for four weeks, or a non-active placebo, for the duration of the study.

Try roasting entire fresh beetroots in foil until tender, or grate beetroot and stir-fry it with red onion and curry paste for a relish that may be served with meat or fish.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C, also known as orascorbic acid, may be found in a variety of fresh vegetables and fruits. The vitamin C content of an average serving ranges from 10 to 40 milligrams. In a study of 29 short-term studies of vitamin C supplements, patients were given 500 mg of vitamin C per day for around eight weeks, and the results were positive in all cases. In this study, blood pressure decreased dramatically, with an average drop in systolic blood pressure of 3.84 mmHg and an average reduction in diastolic blood pressure of 1.48 mmHg.

Those at risk of kidney stones, on the other hand, should exercise caution while taking vitamin C supplements.

Consuming more vegetables and fruit, in addition to increasing your vitamin C consumption, has the added benefit of increasing your potassium intake, which can help counteract the effects of sodium from salt.

What to avoid to lower your blood pressure

For thousands of years, salt, also known as sodium chloride, has been used to preserve foods and enhance their flavor. The use of large amounts of salt is connected with elevated blood pressure. A typical adult requires between 1.2 and 2.4g of salt per day (about a quarter to a half teaspoon), which is equal to 460 to 920mg of sodium per day. Seven out of ten men and three out of ten women in Australia consume far more than that – and significantly more than the maximum recommended daily intake of 5.9 grams of salt (approximately one teaspoon) or 2,300 milligrams of sodium.

A analysis of trials involving 3,230 persons found that lowering salt intake by 4.4 grams per day might lower systolic blood pressure by approximately 4.2 millimeters of mercury and diastolic blood pressure by approximately 2.1 millimeters of mercury.

Those with high blood pressure had even greater decreases, with 5.4 mmHg (systolic) and 2.8 mmHg (diastolic) drops in their readings (diastolic). Foods that are rich in salt should be avoided. Don’t season your meals with salt, and look for lower-salt alternatives of processed items.

Alcohol

When one or more alcoholic drinks are consumed daily, the risk of developing high blood pressure increases by approximately 2.7 mmHg, and the risk of developing low blood pressure increases by approximately 1.4 mmHg. It’s interesting to note that when you first consume an alcoholic beverage, your blood pressure drops, only to climb later. When you’re awake rather than asleep, you’re more likely to have an increase in blood pressure as a result of consuming alcohol. In terms of the bad news, excessive alcohol use, particularly in males, but also in women to a lesser extent, increases your chance of developing high blood pressure.

Liquorice

High blood pressure caused by eating black liquorice is extremely unusual, however it has been reported on occasion. The majority of liquorice candy sold today includes extremely little real liquorice root and, as a result, has very little glycyrrhizic acid (GZA), the active element in licorice. GZA is present in significant concentrations in certain licorice candies on occasion. Because of salt retention and potassium loss caused by GZA, elevated blood pressure is a result of this medication.

If it includes licorice root, proceed with caution.

Caffeine

Caffeine is most frequently found in beverages such as coffee, tea, cola, and energy drinks. In the short term, high doses of caffeine from coffee are associated with elevated blood pressure. People who drank one to two cups of strong coffee had a rise in their systolic blood pressure of 8.1 mmHg and a decrease in their diastolic blood pressure of 5.7 mmHg for up to three hours after drinking it, according to a study of five trials. However, according to three trials that lasted two weeks, consuming coffee had no effect on blood pressure when compared to drinking decaffeinated coffee or avoiding caffeine.

This article was first published on The Conversation.

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