Coffee When Breastfeeding? (Solution found)

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  • Breastfeeding can be exhausting, particularly in the early days when a baby may sleep irregularly and wake up numerous times each night. A morning cup of coffee might help a person manage sleep deprivation, but many people worry about the effects of caffeine on their babies. However, caffeine is safe in moderation for people who are breastfeeding.

Contents

Can I have one coffee a day while breastfeeding?

Most breastfeeding mothers can consume a moderate amount of caffeine (eg a few cups of coffee or tea each day) without it affecting their babies. This is because it can take a newborn baby a long time (ie half-life of 50–100 hours) to process caffeine.

How much coffee did you drink while breastfeeding?

It’s recommended to limit your caffeine intake while breastfeeding, as small amounts can pass into your breast milk, building up in your baby over time. Still, up to 300 mg — about 2–3 cups (470–710 ml) of coffee or 3–4 cups (710–946 ml) of tea — per day is generally considered safe.

Does caffeine in breast milk keep baby awake?

Caffeine Might Keep Moms Awake, But Not Their Babies: Shots – Health News Coffee may help new moms stay awake, but it doesn’t seem to affect breast-fed babies, Brazilian researchers conclude. Babies don’t seem to metabolize caffeine the way older children and adults do.

How does caffeine affect baby?

Facts: Numerous studies on animals have shown that caffeine can cause birth defects, premature labor, preterm delivery, reduced fertility, and increase the risk of low-birth-weight offspring and other reproductive problems.

How long does it take for coffee to get to breast milk?

Maternal Levels. Caffeine appears in breastmilk with a peak usually occurring about 1 hour after a dose.

How do I know if my baby is sensitive to caffeine?

So how do you tell if your baby is sensitive to caffeine? If you consume a significant amount of caffeine and your baby is fussy, wide-eyed and doesn’t sleep for long, you may have a baby that is sensitive to caffeine.

Can coffee give babies gas?

Foods and beverages with caffeine often result in excessive gas for mom and baby, according to Sadik. Your baby’s digestive system is still developing and he can’t excrete caffeine as well as an adult when it is ingested through breastmilk. The energy boost from caffeine could also disrupt his sleep schedule.

Is decaf coffee OK for breastfeeding?

It’s absolutely fine to drink decaf coffee whilst breastfeeding. In fact, there are even some health benefits to it. Just like regular coffee, decaffeinated coffee contains antioxidants, but about fifteen percent may be lost during the decaffeination process.

Does coffee make babies fussy?

Babies who are reacting to your caffeine intake may be unusually irritable, fussy, or wakeful. They may have a harder time staying asleep.

Does coffee affect newborn sleep?

Depending on how much you drink, caffeine may or may not affect your baby’s sleep. “Caffeine goes into the breastmilk but then it quickly goes away. So if you drink it in the morning, by night it will be gone.” Chugging pots of coffee, on the other hand, would be discouraged for a newborn or premature infant.

Is one coffee a day OK when pregnant?

When it comes to caffeine and pregnancy, experts advise women to limit their intake to less than 200 milligrams per day, which is about one cup of coffee. It’s a good idea to cut back on caffeine during pregnancy as much as you can, though, because even smaller amounts could affect your baby.

How much coffee is 200 mg?

Studies show that 100 to 200 mg of caffeine ( about 1 to 2 cups of regular coffee ) are enough to achieve these results. When caffeine consumption climbs to 250 to 700 mg per day, people may experience nausea, headaches, sleep difficulties or increased anxiety.

What if I accidentally had too much caffeine pregnant?

In particular, high caffeine consumption while pregnant can cause increased fetal catecholamine levels, which could lead to increased fetal heart rate and placental vasoconstriction and impair fetal oxygenation. Therefore, caffeine intoxication in pregnant women should be treated immediately.

Alcohol & Caffeine While Breastfeeding: What You Need To Know

It’s good news for new mothers! There is a safe method to consume caffeinated beverages and alcoholic beverages while nursing. Distribute this content In order to prepare for your baby’s arrival, you’ll most likely have gone around 9 months without having a cup of coffee in the morning or a glass of wine at night. As a result, you’ll be pleased to know that you may continue to consume coffee and alcohol while nursing.

​​​​​​​Caffeine While Breastfeeding

We don’t blame a parent for needing a little pick-me-up after a late night or an early morning with her children. Being a mother is exhausting, to say the least, but we have some wonderful news. A modest quantity of caffeine, when used in moderation, will not affect your nursing infant. The intake of caffeine by the mother might result in a tiny quantity of caffeine being passed on to the infant through breast milk. Generally speaking, most newborns are unaffected by this, although some sensitive infants may become more irritable or awake after consuming milk that contains tiny quantities of caffeine.

If you consume more than 300 mg of caffeine per day, we recommend that you reduce your caffeine intake.

Also, be careful to examine the caffeine levels in any other beverages you eat on a daily basis, and keep in mind that caffeine may be found in certain foods as well.

​​​​​​​Alcohol While Breastfeeding

Whether it’s a peaceful night in after the baby is in bed or a much-needed night out with friends, every parent has the right to unwind with a drink (in moderation) and the right to make an educated decision regarding nursing while under the influence of intoxicating substances like alcohol. The majority of professional sources recommend limiting alcohol consumption to 8 ounces of wine or 2 beers and waiting 2 hours before nursing after consuming alcohol. It is also suggested that you restrict your alcohol consumption to 1-2 drinks per week at the most.

Make careful to keep an eye on your weariness and coordination levels, since holding a newborn when fatigued or clumsy can lead to serious blunders that can be fatal.

However, recent study has revealed that alcohol may interfere with the release of oxytocin, therefore we do not advocate taking it to attempt to enhance breast milk production during pregnancy.

If you are making safe, well-informed decisions, you should feel free to do what is best for you and your family.

Can You Still Have Caffeine While You’re Breastfeeding & How Much Is Okay?

You’ve made it through nine months of restricting or eliminating some of your favorite meals and beverages due to pregnancy complications. If you’re a nursing new mom, you might be wondering what’s back on the menu and what you still need to cut out of your diet completely. Caffeine may be at the top of your list of things to avoid during nursing.

Is it OK to consume coffee, tea, or soda at pre-pregnancy levels, in modest amounts like you did before you were expecting, or not at all while pregnant? Here’s everything you need to know about consuming coffee and other caffeinated beverages while breast-feeding your child.

Is it safe to have coffee, tea and other caffeinated drinks when you’re breastfeeding?

Yes, drinking coffee and other caffeinated beverages while nursing is completely safe, just as it is while you’re expecting a child. You are not required to give up your smoking habit simply because you are breastfeeding a child. Despite the fact that caffeine has been identified in breast milk, the quantity passed on to your kid is usually little enough to have no negative effects on him or her. Some newborns are more sensitive to caffeine than others, although this is not always the case. Preemies and newborns, for example, may be a little more sensitive to their surroundings than older infants.

When it comes to caffeine consumption, it’s usually best to avoid consuming it just before or during a breastfeeding or pumping session (or even throughout a session!).

How much caffeine is okay while you’re breastfeeding?

When it comes to caffeine consumption during nursing, the recommendations vary significantly depending on the source, but generally speaking, 200 to 300 mg of caffeine per day is safe. Throughout pregnancy, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) advises up to 200 mg of caffeine per day, which is equivalent to either two small cups of coffee or one 12-ounce cup of coffee per day. This quantity is the same as that recommended during lactation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as well as La Leche League International recommend no more than 300 mg per day, which is equivalent to around two to three cups of coffee (depending on whether you buy a grande or venti) per person.

Should you “pump and dump” with caffeine the way you’ve heard about doing with alcohol?

No. You don’t have to “pump and dump” with caffeine, just as you don’t have to do with light to moderate alcohol intake or tobacco use.

Are there any risks of consuming caffeine while breastfeeding?

You and your baby are not at danger if you consume a little or moderate amount of caffeine during pregnancy. The reaction of each infant to your caffeine usage, on the other hand, will be unique to that individual (if at all). If your baby happens to be more sensitive to coffee than the average infant, she may become more restless or irritable, as well as have difficulty sleeping or calming. Just keep an eye on her and see if reducing the quantity of caffeine you’re drinking, as well as having it a few hours before a feeding, helps to alleviate her symptoms.

Do not feel as though you have to give up your daily cup or two of coffee or tea because you are breastfeeding your baby.

Do not hesitate to consult with your doctor if you are concerned about caffeine during nursing or have any concerns about it.

Read our medical review and editorial policy to find out how we ensure that our material is correct and up to date at all times.

Can I Drink Coffee While Breastfeeding?

While nursing, you are not need to abstain from coffee consumption. Drinking modest quantities of caffeine each day — the equivalent of around two to three 8-ounce cups — is unlikely to have a negative impact on your baby’s development. Keep in mind that the amount of caffeine in a cup of coffee can vary based on the type of coffee bean used and the length of time the cup is brewed. Experts advise that you consume no more than 200 to 300 mg of caffeine per day at a “safe” level. Continue reading for more information on coffee and nursing.

Additionally, when you consume coffee, just a little amount of caffeine really travels via breast milk.

Coffee and other caffeinated beverages such as tea, chocolate, energy drinks and sodas are all common sources of caffeine in our diets.

Despite the fact that caffeine is classified as a “maternal medicine that is typically compatible with breastfeeding” by the American Academy of Pediatrics, it’s still a good idea to keep your daily caffeine intake to 300 milligrams or less each day.

  • Irritability, irregular sleep patterns, jitteriness, and fussiness are all symptoms of ADHD.

Irritability, irregular sleep patterns, jitteriness, and fussiness are all symptoms of anxiety.

  • Migraines, difficulty sleeping, frequent urination, upset stomach, high heart rate, and muscular tremors are all symptoms of migraines.

Does caffeine affect breast-milk supply?

According to the available research, consuming coffee or caffeine in modest doses does not have an influence on the amount of breast milk your body produces. If you’ve ever heard the term “pump and dump,” it’s probably because it refers to the practice of consuming alcohol while nursing. When you pump out milk, you are removing any components that may have been affected by a potentially dangerous drug, such as alcohol or caffeine. Pumping, in reality, is only utilized to assist conserve your supply if you do not intend to feed your kid at a specific time.

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As a result, you will have to wait for the caffeine to be metabolized naturally out of your breastmilk.

Coffee should be had shortly before feeding your baby, or if your infant spends more than 2 hours between feedings, wait to consume your coffee until soon after you’ve completed feeding baby, to limit the chance of passing caffeine on to him or her.

The size of what you would consider to be a cup of coffee might vary significantly.

A cup of coffee, according to the caffeine guidelines established by experts, is defined as 8 ounces of brewed coffee or 1 ounce of stronger beverages, such as espresso.

What about light, medium, and dark brews?

Drinking coffee or caffeine in modest doses does not appear to have any negative effects on the amount of breast milk your body produces. If you’ve ever heard the term “pump and dump,” it’s probably because it refers to the practice of consuming alcohol while nursing your baby. When you pump out milk, you are removing any components that may have been affected by a potentially dangerous chemical, such alcohol or caffeine. However, pumping is only done to assist maintain your supply if you do not want to feed your kid at a specific time.

  • As a result, you will have to wait for the caffeine to gradually metabolize its way out of your breastmilk.
  • Coffee should be had shortly before feeding your baby, or if your baby spends more than 2 hours between feedings, wait to consume your coffee until soon after you’ve completed feeding your baby to limit the danger of passing on caffeine to baby.
  • There is a wide variety in size between what you could consider a cup of coffee.
  • An 8-ounce cup of brewed coffee or 1 ounce of stronger beverages, such as espresso, is defined as a cup of coffee by the caffeine experts who determine the standards.

Drink more water

Increasing your water consumption can aid in the maintenance of proper hydration in your body. Perhaps it will even help you feel more energized. After example, one of the earliest indicators of dehydration is the sensation of being fatigued or exhausted. Breastfeeding mothers should drink a minimum of 13 cups of water every day.

Move your body

Walking around the block or watching a fast workout video may be the last thing on your mind when you’re exhausted, but doing some exercise might help you feel better by boosting endorphins and decreasing stress levels. The quality of your sleep may also be improved as a result of this. Once you have been cleared to engage in physical exercise following childbirth, aim to complete around 150 minutes of moderate activity each week.

Eatwe ll

It is especially vital to fuel your body with a well-balanced diet when you are nursing. The amount of calories you should consume depends on your weight and degree of exercise. However, you should aim for an additional 500 calories per day, for a total of 2,300 to 2,500 calories per day when nursing. The right amount of food might help you feel more energetic and increase your milk production.

Pare down theto-dolist

Put your tasks in order of importance and devote your efforts to yourself and your child’s bonding time.

If your friends and family have offered to assist you in lightening your mental and physical burden during your baby’s first year of life, now is an opportune moment to accept their offers.

Connect with others

Isolating oneself during the early days of parenthood might be simple, especially if your kid is constantly nursing and you’re exhausted. Getting out of the house and spending time with friends and family can assist to lift your mood and re-energize your body. A cup of coffee is a simple and soothing routine that you do not have to give up simply because you are nursing your child. Make sure to keep your caffeine intake reasonable, ranging between 200 and 300 mg per day. The majority of newborns will not have any negative side effects from this amount of intake, but keep an eye out for indicators like as fussiness, irritability, or poor sleep in your baby and young children.

Is it safe to drink coffee if I am breastfeeding?

Yes, it is entirely fine to use coffee while you are nursing your child. Despite the fact that caffeine from your diet and beverages does wind up in your breast milk, most studies indicates that the quantity is less than one percent of the total amount you consume. How many cups of coffee is considered acceptable? The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that children drink no more than three cups of coffee per day; the La Leche League recommends that children drink no more than five cups per day.

  • Find out how much caffeine is in particular beverages by looking at the label.
  • It’s quite improbable that the caffeine you consume will have any negative consequences on your kid.
  • If you eliminate caffeine from your diet for a week, you should notice a difference in the behavior of your child.
  • If she does, you’ve got your answer right there.
  • As a result, you may relax and enjoy your cup of coffee without having to think about it.

Breastfeeding and Caffeine • KellyMom.com

  • Introduction
  • Is my kid sensitive to the amount of coffee I consume? Does caffeine have an effect on milk production? Sources of Caffeine
  • What is an excessive amount of caffeine
  • More information may be found here. References

Introduction

Caffeine is generally tolerated well by most nursing women when used in moderation. Some newborns, particularly those under 6 months of age, may be more sensitive to their mother’s caffeine use than other babies. Babies whose moms fully avoided caffeine throughout pregnancy appear to respond more negatively to caffeine in their mother’s diet. It’s possible that even if baby is sensitive to caffeine now, he won’t be in the future. If you do have to quit or reduce your caffeine usage, you may try again when baby is older if he’s not too sensitive to it now.

139-140) In terms of lactation risk, caffeine is classified as L2 (lower risk).

It has been shown in one study that prolonged coffee use may lower the iron content of breastmilk.1 (NehligDebry, 1994).

If your newborn is sensitive to caffeine, it is likely that the sensitivity will diminish as the child grows older and develops more independence.

Caffeine metabolism is far more difficult in newborns than in older babies. Preterm or sick newborns may also have more difficulties adjusting to their mother’s caffeine use.

Half-Life of Caffeine
Age Half-Life
Newborn up to 97.5 hours
3 – 5 months approx. 14 hours
6+ months 2.6 hours
Adult 4.9 hours
References:Hale 2017

Is baby sensitive to my caffeine intake?

The authors ofBreastfeeding Answers Made Simple(Hale Publishing 2010, p. 521) state that excessive caffeine use by the mother (more than 750 mg per day) might result in a newborn who exhibits indications of caffeine stimulation during the feeding process. In the case of a woman who drinks daily 750 mg or more of caffeine – the amount of caffeine in five 5-ounce cups of coffee – and her infant appears irritable and fussy, as well as not sleeping well, she may consider replacing caffeine-free beverages for a week or two.

If you decide to eliminate caffeine from your diet, consider doing so gradually, since abruptly ceasing to consume caffeine might cause headaches and other symptoms.

Does caffeine decrease milk supply?

Photograph courtesy of Alexander Lyubavin on Flickr. CC BY 2.0 (Creative Commons) There is no evidence to suggest that caffeine reduces milk production. The notion that coffee would cause a reduction in milk production is widely held. Caffeine is used by a large number of mothers, therefore it should be simple to record any negative effects of caffeine on milk production. Despite a large number of research on caffeine intake in nursing moms as well as years of clinical observation, no such impact has been seen.

In contrast, a baby who is irritable and jittery as a result of caffeine stimulation may not breastfeed effectively, which may result in a reduced milk production over time (as a result of less nursing rather than as a result of increased caffeine consumption).

Caffeine Sources

It can be found in a variety of beverages, including coffee, tea and soft drinks, sports/energy drinks (including “sports water” products), as well as some over-the-counter and prescription drugs, as well as meals that include coffee or chocolate. Caffeine can be found in herbal preparations that contain guarana/paullinea cupana, kola nut/cola nitida, yerba maté, or green tea, among other ingredients. Information on the caffeine level of various foods is provided below.

Typical caffeine content of various foods(Caffeine in teacoffee will vary widely depending on brewing, etc)
Product Size(ounces) Caffeine (mg) Product Size(ounces) Caffeine (mg)
Coffee Soda
Starbucks Coffee, short 8 250 7-Eleven Big Gulp cola 64 190
Starbucks Coffee, tall 12 375 Mountain Dew 12 55
Starbucks Coffee, grande 16 500 Diet Coke 12 46
Starbucks Caffe Latte or Cappuccino, grande 16 70 Coke Classic 12 36
Starbucks Coffee Frappuccino 9.5 98 Vanilla Coke 12 32
Starbucks Espresso, double 2 150 Dr. Pepper, regular or diet 12 42
Maxwell House Cappuccino (various) 8 45-65 Pepsi-Cola 12 40
Coffee, brewed (non-gourmet) 8 120-180 Sunkist Orange Soda 12 34
Coffee, instant 8 80 Barq’s Root Beer 12 22
Coffee, decaffeinated 8 3 Caffeine-free versions of Coke, Diet Coke, Pepsi, Diet Pepsi, Mountain Dew, Barq’s, etc. 12
Minute Maid Orange, Slice, Sprite, 7-Up, A W Root Beer, Mug Root Beer 12
Tea Ice cream, yogurt, candy
Tea, leaf or bag 8 48 Starbucks Coffee Java Chip Ice Cream 4 28
Tea, green 8 30-35 Häagen-Dazs Coffee Ice Cream 4 24
Arizona Iced Tea, assorted varieties 16 15-30 Breyers Chocolate Ice Cream 8 6
Snapple Iced Tea 16 42 Dannon Coffee Yogurt 6 36
Other drinks Stonyfield Farm Cappuccino Yogurt 8
Cocoa or Hot Chocolate 8 2-5 Hershey’s Milk Chocolate bar 1.55 10
Herbal iced tea, lemonade, fruit juice, milk, tap water, plain bottled water 12 Hershey’s Special Dark Chocolate bar 1.45 31
Compiled from various sources.

How much caffeine is too much?

The only way to receive a personalized response to this question is to see your infant in action. As previously said, the quantity of caffeine that may be harmful to a newborn may vary greatly based on the unique infant, as well as the baby’s age and overall health. The most common number we receive is “less than five 5-ounce cups of coffee” per day, or 500 mg per day. Various sources recommend a daily caffeine intake of no more than 300-750 mg, depending on the source. During pregnancy: Most sources recommend that pregnant women consume no more than 300 mg of caffeine each day.

Coffee, tea, soda, and other caffeinated beverages are included in the table below along with various advised upper limits for caffeine in terms of amounts consumed.

It should be noted that energy drinks frequently include vitamins as well, and vitamin poisoning may be a concern when used in conjunction with other nutritional supplements.

Equivalent caffeinated products for various daily caffeine intakes
Food CaffeineContent 150 mg 300 mg 500 mg
Starbucks Coffee 250 mg/8 oz (short)375 mg/12 oz (tall)500 mg/16 oz (grande) 1/2 cup (short) 1 cup (short) 2 cups (short)1.5 cups (tall)1 cup (grande)
Coffee, brewed(non-gourmet) 100 mg/5 oz160 mg/8 oz 1.5 cups (5-oz)1 cup (8-oz) 3 cups (5-oz)2 cups (8-oz) 5 cups (5-oz)3 cups (8-oz)
Starbucks Frappuccino 98 mg/9.5 oz bottle 1.5 bottles 3 bottles 5 bottles
Diet Coke 46 mg/12 oz can77 mg/20 oz bottle 3 cans (12-oz)2 bottles (20-oz) 6.5 cans (12-oz)4 bottles (20-oz) 11 cans (12-oz)6.5 bottles (20-oz)
Pepsi-Cola 40 mg/12 oz can67 mg/20 oz bottle 3.5 cans (12-oz)2 bottles (20-oz) 7.5 cans (12-oz)4.5 bottles (20-oz) 12.5 cans (12-oz)7.5 bottles (20-oz)
Tea, leaf or bag 48 mg/8 oz 3 cups (8-oz) 6 cups (8-oz) 10 cups (8-oz)
Häagen-Dazs Coffee Ice Cream 24 mg/4 oz serving 6 servings (4-oz) 12.5 servings (4-oz) 20 servings (4-oz)
Dannon Coffee Yogurt 36 mg/6 oz serving 4 servings (6-oz) 8 servings (6-oz) 13 servings (6-oz)
Monster Energy 160 mg/16 oz can 1 can (16-oz) 2 cans (16-oz) 3.5 cans (16-oz)

More information

  • Denise Fisher, BN, RN, RM, IBCLC, discusses how to deal with a problem that isn’t black and white: social drugs and breastfeeding. Contains discussions about the use of nicotine and other substances such as alcohol, caffeine, marijuana, heroin, and methadone
  • The Center for Science in the Public Interest published a report on the caffeine concentration in foods and pharmaceuticals. Consumer Reports published a story in July 2003 on caffeinated children.

References

A study by J. Thorlton, A. Ahmed, and D. Colby found that energy drinks have negative effects on breastfeeding mothers when consumed in large quantities. MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing, published a third edition in 2016 with a focus on 179-185. doi:10.1097/nmc.0000000000000228. An investigation of the relationship between maternal caffeine use and infant nighttime waking was carried out by Santos et al. (Maternal Caffeine Consumption and Infant Nighttime Waking: Prospective Cohort Study).

  1. Pediatrics 2011-1773 was published online on April 2, 2012 (10.1542/peds.2011-1773).
  2. Nawrot and colleagues studied the effects of caffeine on human health.
  3. 2003 Jan;20(1):1-30.
  4. 2003 Jan;20(1):1-30.
  5. Koren G.
  6. In moderation, of course.
  7. A.

Debry Chronic maternal intake of coffee during pregnancy and breastfeeding has negative consequences for the newborn: a review of the evidence 13(1):6-21 in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition in 1994.

Joshi et al.

Biopharmaceutical Drug Disposal, May-June 1988, 9(3):285-99.

Developmental Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol.

6, 1985, pp.

This tiny study found that when moms consumed 500 mg of caffeine per day, there were no significant changes in the heart rates and sleep duration of their breastfed babies.

A study of the disposition of dietary caffeine in nursing women’s milk, saliva, and plasma was carried out by Berlin CM Jr, Denson HM, Daniel CH, and Ward RM.

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73, no.

59-63.

In 1983, Pediatr Pharmacol (New York) published 3(3-4):237-44. A study of caffeine release into breast milk was conducted by Tyrala EE and Dodson WE. 1979 Oct;54(10):787-800. Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Breastfeeding and caffeine

Energy Drinks: Implications for Breastfeeding Mothers, by J. Thorlton, A. Ahmed, and D. Colby. American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. 2016;41(3):179-185. MCN, The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing doi:10.1097/nmc.0000000000000228. In a prospective cohort study, Santos et al. investigated the relationship between maternal caffeine use and infant nighttime waking. Pediatrics. 101542/peds.2011-1773) was published online on April 2, 2012. P. Nawrot and colleagues, “The Effects of Caffeine on Human Health,” Journal of the American Medical Association, vol.

  • 2003 Jan;20(1):1-30; abstract available at http://www.foodadditcontam.com.
  • Can caffeine be used when pregnant?
  • To be used with caution.
  • Canadian Family Physician.
  • and A.
  • Journal of the American College of Nutrition According to the findings of this research, modest levels of caffeine consumed by mothers during pregnancy and nursing had no discernible effects on the fetus or newborn infant.

Stavchansky S (first author), Combs A (co-author), Sagraves R (co-author), Stavchansky S (co-author), Stavchansky S (co-author), Stavchansky S (co-author), Stavchansky S (co-author), Stavchansky S (co-author), Pharmacokinetics of caffeine in breast milk and plasma following a single oral caffeine treatment to breastfeeding moms, Joshi A, et al.

  1. 1985;8(6):355-363.
  2. According to this short study, when moms consumed 500 mg of caffeine per day, there were no significant changes in the heart rates and sleep patterns of their breastfed babies.
  3. 1984;73(1):59-63.
  4. A lack of pharmacologically active caffeine levels in the saliva of breast-fed newborns, according to Hildebrandt and Gundert-Remy 237-44, in Pediatr Pharmacol (New York), volume 3 (three and four).

A study of caffeine release into breast milk was carried out by Tyrala EE and Dodson WE. Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. 1979 Oct;54(10):787-800.

WILL CAFFEINE AFFECT MY BABY?

Whether or not your morning cup of coffee or tea has an impact on your breastfeeding infant is something you may be curious about. It may be heartening to know that modest levels of caffeine consumed during pregnancy are unlikely to have an adverse effect on your full-term, healthy baby, especially after the first few months. Baby eats relatively moderate levels of caffeine, around 1.5 percent of the amount used by the mother in most circumstances. Mohrbacher (2020, p.566) describes the process as follows: As stated by the European Food Safety Authority in 2020, a daily intake of two cups of coffee (containing 200 mg of caffeine) is acceptable to drink when breastfeeding a child.

You should keep in mind, however, that caffeine is a stimulant of the central nervous system, and you should take the following precautions:

IS MY BABY MORE LIKELY THAN OTHERS TO REACT TO CAFFEINE?

Babies who are preterm, less than six months old, or who have other health difficulties may be more prone to exhibit symptoms because caffeine takes longer to leave their systems than healthy babies. (Hale, ed., 2019). The concentration of caffeine in your milk reaches its maximum one to two hours after consumption.

WHAT SYMPTOMS MIGHT MY BABY HAVE?

Your baby’s behavior may be abnormally irritated, fussy, or awake if he or she is reacting to your coffee use. They may have a more difficult time falling asleep.

WHAT OTHER BEVERAGES AND FOODS MIGHT HAVE CAFFEINE IN THEM?

Aside from coffee and tea, caffeine may be found in a variety of other foods and beverages. Some examples of sources are as follows:

  • Cocoa/chocolate
  • Coffee (decaffeinated coffee has 3 percent caffeine)
  • Tea
  • And other beverages Tea (including black tea, green tea, and various herbal infusions). Matcha green tea includes a significant amount of caffeine compared to other types of green tea. Some teas are caffeine-free
  • Others include caffeine. energizing beverages Drinks with carbonation (soda, pop)
  • Sports drinks
  • Flavored water
  • Pain relievers, menstrual comfort pills, and weight-loss supplements are all examples of medications.

When caffeine exists naturally in a food or beverage, it is not required to be labeled. Caffeine can come from a variety of sources, some of which are listed below: Cornelis Reyes and Cornelis Reyes (2018) An up-to-date list of the caffeine content in foods and beverages may be found here. If you are unsure whether a product contains caffeine, look at the label, if one is available. Caffeine is naturally present in several beverages, such as coffee, tea, and soda/pop, unless otherwise stated on the label.

HOW MUCH CAFFEINE IS SAFE TO CONSUME?

While nursing, it is considered safe to eat up to 200-300 mg of caffeine, which is equivalent to around 2-3 cups of coffee (EFSA, 2020; CDC, 2020). In accordance with the Mayo Clinic, an average 8-ounce cup of coffee has 95-165 milligrams of caffeine, whereas an average 8-ounce cup of black tea might have 25-48 milligrams of caffeine. It is possible that the strength of coffee or any caffeinated beverage will vary from person to person; thus, it is recommended that you study the serving size and nutritional labels before consuming.

WHAT CAN I TRY IF I THINK MY BABY IS REACTING TO CAFFEINE?

In the event you believe your baby is responding to your caffeine use, you might try switching to caffeine-free beverages for two to three weeks (Mohrbacher 2020). This will allow you ample time for the caffeine to leave your system, and you will be able to determine whether or not caffeine is having an effect on your baby.

Caffeine consumption should be reduced gradually, since abrupt reductions may result in headaches if the dose is reduced too soon. With age, it is possible that caffeine will have less of an effect on the baby.

References

T. W. Hale, T. W. Hale & Co. (2019). MedicinesMother’s Milk is a natural remedy. Springer Publishing Company, LLC, New York, New York, 2019. Springer Publishing Company, LLC. Staff at the Mayo Clinic. (n.d.). Caffeine content in a variety of beverages including coffee, tea, soda, and others. Nancy Mohrbacher’s website was used to obtain this information. Breastfeeding Answers: A Guide for Helping Families, Second Edition, is a resource for families who are breastfeeding. Nancy Mohrbacher Solutions, Inc.

  1. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), based in Parma, Italy, is responsible for food safety.
  2. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Maternal Diet, October 2020 to June 2021).
  3. How Much Caffeine Is in Decaf Coffee?, according to Healthline.
  4. September 201811 June 2021 The Center for Science in the Public Interest is a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing science in the public interest.

Caffeine

Caffeine emerges in breastmilk rather quickly after the mother consumes it. There is an insufficient amount of high-quality data available to offer strong evidence-based recommendations on the safe ingestion of caffeine by pregnant women. Fussiness, jitteriness, and irregular sleep patterns have been observed in newborns whose moms use large amounts of caffeine, comparable to 10 or more cups of coffee per day, according to research. Studies conducted on women who consumed 5 cups of coffee per day discovered that their breastfed children aged 3 weeks and older had little stimulation.

But because premature and younger newborn infants metabolize caffeine very slowly and may have serum levels of caffeine and other active coffee metabolites that are similar to their mothers’ levels, it is preferable for mothers of these infants to consume less caffeine than they would otherwise consume.

If you drink more than 450 mL of coffee per day, it may lower the iron contents in your breastmilk, which may result in moderate iron deficiency anemia in certain breastfed infants.

Drug Levels

The half-life of caffeine in late pregnancy is significantly longer than in nonpregnant women; however, the half-life of caffeine in postpartum women recovers to normal during the first week after giving birth. As a result of the induction of CYP1A2 by smoking, smokers have more fast caffeine clearance and shorter half-lives than non-smokers. Early in life, preterm and newborn infants have very poor caffeine clearance, which only approaches adult levels by 3 to 5 months of age. Levels of Maternal Involvement Caffeine is found in breastmilk, with a peak concentration reaching around 1 hour after a caffeine dosage.

  • In a study conducted 2 hours after breakfast, five women between the ages of 4 months and 1 year after giving birth were given a dosage of 150 mg of caffeine orally as caffeine sodium benzoate solution.
  • On a second occasion, one of the women took a 300 mg dosage, and her milk caffeine levels were about twice as high as they were after receiving the 150 mg dose.
  • Milk samples were collected from the two women over a period of 12 and 48 hours, respectively.
  • In eight milk samples obtained over a 10.5 hour period from a woman who drank three cups of coffee in one hour and then coffee whenever she felt like it during the day, caffeine concentrations ranged from 0.32 to 1.15 mg/L in milk from the mother.
  • From 2 weeks to 9 months old, their breastfed infants were observed in the study.
  • In the study, four moms had undetectable caffeine levels (0.2 mg/L), despite having consumed less than 100 mg of caffeine.
  • Five days after the intervention, nine nursing moms had 750 mg of caffeine in the form of instant coffee (5 doses of 150 mg).

The average caffeine content in the mothers’ milk was 4.3 mg/L, with a range of 0.25 mg/L to 28.6 mg/L.

Caffeine was no longer evident in any of the milk samples after day nine.

In a randomized, double-blind trial, eleven nursing moms were randomly assigned to eat either 5 cups of decaffeinated coffee or 5 cups of decaffeinated coffee with a total of 500 mg of additional caffeine daily for 5 days, depending on their preference.

After a 24-hour collection period on day 5, the average caffeine concentration in the milk of the mothers who ingested caffeine was 3.1 mg/L, which corresponded to an average daily consumption of 2.4 mg or 0.5 mg/kg of body weight for the babies.

Over the course of the next 24 hours, ten breastmilk samples were obtained from each breast.

It took an average of 7.2 hours for caffeine concentrations in milk from both breasts to fall by half their initial levels.

Five nursing moms between the ages of 6 and 28 weeks after giving birth were given a single dosage of 200 mg of caffeine in the form of tablets.

Peak caffeine levels in milk were reached in around 1 hour, whereas peak metabolite levels in milk were reached in approximately 5 to 10 hours for paraxanthine and in approximately 10 to 15 hours for theobromine and theophylline, respectively.

After one woman drank a cup of espresso containing 80 mg of caffeine, the caffeine content in her breastmilk reached a high of 2.05 ng/L two hours after she had ingested the espresso beverage.

On a daily basis, the authors assessed that the woman’s 2-month-old newborn was drinking 167 milliliters per kilogram (mL) of milk and 0.1 milligrams per kilogram (mg) of caffeine, which was 8.9 percent of the mother’s weight-adjusted intake.

Four women gave anonymously provided milk samples for testing to be conducted.

InfantLevels.

All but two of the children were exclusively breastfed.

Thirteen nursing moms had a beverage containing caffeine in doses ranging from 35 to 336 mg.

In the urine of any of their children, caffeine was not identified (0.2 mg/L) throughout the 5-hour collection period that began 2 hours after the mother consumed coffee.

Caffeine concentrations in the urine of a 7-day-old breastfed child reached 1 mg/L about 24 to 40 hours after his mother took a combination of butalbital 50 mg, acetaminophen 325 mg, and caffeine 50 mg once every 6 hours for 24 consecutive hours.

Effects in Breastfed Infants

In late pregnancy, caffeine’s half-life is significantly longer than it is in nonpregnant women; however, the half-life of caffeine in postpartum women recovers to normal within the first week following delivery. As a result of the induction of CYP1A2 by smoking, smokers had faster caffeine clearance and shorter half-lives than non-smokers. Although caffeine clearance is extremely low in premature and newborn infants, it approaches adult levels by 3 to 5 months of age in older children and adolescents.

  1. Activated metabolites were not measured in the majority of the research.
  2. After the treatment, the average caffeine concentrations were 1.6, 1.5, and 0.9 mg/L at 30, 60, and 120 minutes after the dose.
  3. One hundred eighty milligrams of caffeine were consumed by two breastfeeding women who were 7 and 13 weeks postpartum.
  4. Peak milk concentrations of 1.3 and 1.6 mg/L were reached after 1.5 and 2 hours, respectively.
  5. A caffeine-containing beverage of their choice (coffee or tea) containing caffeine in levels ranging from 35 to 336 mg was consumed by fifteen women.
  6. Caffeine was detected in the breastmilk of eleven of the women, with peak levels ranging from 2.1 to 7.2 mg/L in each case.
  7. Caffeine in milk has a mean half-life of 6.1 hours on average.

On days 5 and 9, following four days without caffeine use, 24-hour milk samples were obtained from a pooled sample pool.

All milk samples tested negative for caffeine by day nine.

One hundred and eleven nursing moms took part in a randomized, double-blind research in which they were randomly assigned to drink 5 cups of decaffeinated coffee or 5 cups of decaffeinated coffee with a total of 500 mg of caffeine everyday for 5 days.

Women who took caffeine had an average caffeine content of 3.1 mg/L in their milk on day 5, which corresponded to an average daily consumption of 2.4 mg or 0.5 mg/kg for the babies over a 24-hour collection period on that day.

During the next 24 hours, ten breastmilk samples were obtained from each breast.

It took an average of 7.2 hours for caffeine contents in milk from both breasts to decline.

One dosage of 200 mg of caffeine was administered as tablets to five nursing women who were between 6 and 28 weeks postpartum.

When it comes to caffeine, peak levels in milk occur around 1 hour after consumption.

According to the authors, an exclusively breastfed newborn would receive a caffeine dose of 7 percent and a total xanthine dose of 18 percent of the mother weight-adjusted dosage if she were solely breastfed.

In breastmilk collected after 24 hours, caffeine was found to be undetectable (0.001 ng/L).

Caffeine had a half-life of 4 hours in human breastmilk.

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In their milk samples, caffeine was identified in amounts of 33, 35, 988, and 1011 nanograms per gram of milk, respectively.

The caffeine levels in the saliva of nine breastfed children ranging in age from 14 days to 19 weeks were tested after their mothers had one cup of coffee (each).

When measured between 1 and 6 hours after the mother consumed coffee, the saliva caffeine levels of the seven totally breastfed babies varied from 0.21 to 0.75 mg/L.

They were not able to detect caffeine (0.2 mg/L) in any of their infants’ urine samples collected during a 5-hour period that began 2 hours after the mothers consumed caffeine.

Caffeine concentrations in the urine of a 7-day-old breastfed child reached 1 mg/L about 24 to 40 hours after his mother took a combination of butalbital 50 mg, acetaminophen 325 mg, and caffeine 50 mg, every 6 hours for 24 consecutive hours.

Effects on Lactation and Breastmilk

As of the date of the change, no relevant published information could be discovered.

References

1.McCreedy A, Bird S, Brown LJ, et al., “Effects of maternal caffeine use on the breastfed child: A systematic study,” Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 2018; 148:w14665. Swiss Medical Weekly (2018). 2.James J., Lawrence R., and others Is it possible to use coffee while nursing without endangering your child? Ruth Lawrence, PhD, was the subject of this interview. Journal of Caffeine Research, 2011; 1:192–4. Three-year-old breast-fed babies’ heart rates and sleep duration are affected by their mothers’ caffeine usage, according to Ryu JE (Japan).

  • Developmental Pharmacology and Therapeutics.
  • 4.McNamara PJ, Abbassi M.
  • Journal of Pediatrics.
  • Pharm Res 2004; 21:555–66.
  • 5.Oo CY, Burgio DE, Kuhn RC, et al.
  • In Costa Rica, coffee drinking has been identified as a risk factor for iron deficiency anemia among pregnant women and their newborns (Muoz LM, Lönnerdal B, Keen CL, et al.).
  • Klausnutti, Hans-Joachim Rothweiler, and Hans-Christian Schlatter.

8) Berlin CM Jr, Denson HM, Daniel CH, and colleagues.Disposition of dietary caffeine in milk, saliva, and plasma of breastfeeding women: a systematic review Pediatrics, vol.

5, pp.

Nineteenth-century analgesic medications were found in breast milk and plasma, according to Findlay JW, DeAngelis RL, Kearney MF, and colleagues.

29, no.

10.Stavchansky S, Combs A, Sagraves R, et al.

The pharmacokinetics of caffeine in breast milk and plasma following a single oral caffeine delivery to breastfeeding women were investigated.

Naylor A, Bailey DN, Welbert RT; Bailey DN et al.

1982; 6:64–8.

14.Calvaresi V, Escuder D, Minutillo A, et al.

Musatadi M., Gonzalez-Gaya B., Irazola M., et al.

Separations.2021; 816.

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Gundert-Remy.

In 1983, Pediatr Pharmacol (New York) published 3:237–44.

The use of an acetaminophen-butalbital-caffeine product by the mother, resulting in butalbital exposure in the infant through breast milk.

Published in Clinical Toxicology.

Drugs in breast milk.

Drugs in breast milk 1977; 7:59–63.

Caffeine and newborns, according to Clement MI.

Caffeine and infants in the British Medical Journal (1989); 298:1461.PMC1836572.20.

PMC1837125.21.Martin I, López-Vilchez MA, Mur A, et al.

After prolonged mother mate consumption, a symptom of neonatal withdrawal develops.

Santos IS, Matijasevich A, Domingues MR. Ther Drug Monit. 2007; 29:127–9.22. Santos IS, Matijasevich A, Domingues MR. A prospective cohort research looked at the relationship between maternal caffeine use and newborn overnight waking. Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, 2012; 129:860–8.

Can Mothers Still Drink Coffee While Breastfeeding?

Image of the mother courtesy of The Image Bank / Getty Images There are few, if any, moments in your life when you will be as exhausted as you will be during the first few weeks after having a new baby. The arduous nights of disturbed sleep caused by the constant interruptions take their toll, and nursing itself is demanding. When it comes to staying awake and functioning during the day, coffee may seem like an absolute requirement. However, you may be wondering whether caffeine use while nursing is hazardous to your infant.

Caffeine in Breast Milk

While it is known for certain that the caffeine you consume through drinking coffee, tea, and other commonly consumed caffeine-containing foods and beverages will pass into your breast milk, the amount of caffeine found in the breast milk of women who consume caffeine varies from woman to woman and from pregnancy to pregnancy. There are significant variances not just in the quantity of caffeine present in meals and beverages, but also in the rates at which caffeine is absorbed and eliminated from one woman to another.

If you don’t pay attention to the timing of your own coffee intake and your nursing sessions, this might result in caffeine building up in your baby’s system.

This gives you an indication of how long it takes.

Although it is impossible to estimate how much caffeine your baby may receive through your breast milk, you can minimize the risk by doing the following:

  • Limiting one cup of coffee every day
  • It is recommended that you nurse your infant before drinking caffeinated beverages and then wait three hours before nursing again.

Nutritional Effects

Caffeine has a negative impact on the composition of breast milk. It has been shown that the iron content of breast milk produced by women who routinely consume three cups of coffee per day throughout pregnancy and nursing is one-third lower than that of those who do not use caffeine. Mothers who consume coffee, as well as their newborns, may have reduced hemoglobin and hematocrit levels as a result. Those who live in nations where strong coffee intake is popular are more likely to suffer from iron deficiency anemia.

Effects

Due to the fact that caffeine is a stimulant, infants who take caffeine are more “wide awake” and jittery, colicky, constipated, and restless than infants who do not use caffeine. As a matter of fact, caffeine is occasionally used therapeutically to stimulate preemies who are at danger of developing sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The consumption of caffeine can, therefore, have a substantial influence on your baby’s capacity to go asleep. Moms can become trapped in a self-perpetuating loop of overindulging in coffee to cope with the exhaustion of having an unsettled baby, while the infant becomes unsettled as a result of the overstimulating environment.

If your infant is having trouble settling, reducing your coffee intake may help to alleviate the issue a little.

Caffeine Withdrawal

In order to avoid the discomfort of caffeine withdrawal, you should avoid abruptly ceasing your caffeine consumption if you have been drinking a lot. This will most likely cause headaches and irritability in both you and your baby. Reduce your caffeine intake gradually to prevent causing discomfort to yourself or your baby. Despite the fact that headaches are a frequent withdrawal effect, using pain relievers during nursing is not recommended.

A Word From Verywell

Coffee is not currently thought to be incompatible with nursing, and it may even be beneficial to newborns who are at risk of apnea since it stimulates them. However, it has been shown to impair the nutritional value of breast milk over time, and it may also lead to issues calming your baby, making you even more exhausted as a result. Caffeine usage should be timed carefully to avoid overindulging. However, keep in mind that excessive caffeine consumption can have a lot of negative consequences on the body, some of which may be detrimental to your kid.

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  • “Breastfeeding and the Use of Recreational Drugs—Alcohol, Caffeine, Nicotine, and Marijuana,” by J. Liston, is available online. Breastfeeding Review6:27-30 (1998)
  • Breastfeeding Review6:27-30 (1998)
  • Breastfeeding Review6:27-30 (1998) “The Transfer of Drugs and Other Chemicals into Human Milk,” according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Pediatrics 108:776-789 (2001)
  • Clement, M., “Caffeine and Babies.” Pediatrics 108:776-789 (2001). In 1989, the British Medical Journal298:1461.

Coffee while breastfeeding: Safety and risks

We feature goods that we believe will be of interest to our readers. If you make a purchase after clicking on one of the links on this page, we may receive a small commission. Here’s how we went about it. Breastfeeding may be tiring, especially in the early days when a baby’s sleep patterns are unpredictable and he or she wakes up many times every night. A cup of coffee in the morning may be beneficial in coping with sleep deprivation, but many people are concerned about the effects of caffeine on their newborns.

  • In this post, you will learn about the hazards and advantages of drinking coffee while nursing, as well as alternative sources of caffeine to avoid.
  • It is doubtful that caffeine use before nursing would have any negative consequences.
  • Caffeine, on the other hand, is significantly less likely to have an adverse effect on a nursing child.
  • Caffeine, according to Dr.
  • Only approximately one percent of the caffeine a woman drinks makes it into her breast milk, and even this microscopic quantity is not enough to cause harm to the majority of newborns in the United States.
  • 2–3 cups of coffee have the same amount of caffeine as this serving.
  • However, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warns that excessive caffeine use (more than 10 cups per day) may induce symptoms in the newborn, such as fussiness and jitteriness.
  • It is possible that a person who has recently nursed would opt to keep an eye on their child during this period to see if they are experiencing any side effects from the caffeine.
  • Some experts are concerned that caffeine may have an adverse effect on a baby’s sleep, however a 2012 study conducted on 885 newborns in Brazil found that this is not the case.
  • A Korean research also concluded that drinking coffee caffeine while nursing did not pose any major dangers, especially when used in moderation, such as a few cups per day.
  • Some individuals claim that the acids in coffee may diminish the iron level of breast milk.

People should do whatever makes them feel most comfortable, as there is no medical reason to refrain from drinking coffee while breast feeding a child. Additionally, there is no proof that caffeine has any direct advantages for the infant.

What about decaf coffee?

The items that we include are those that we believe will be of interest to our audience. We may receive a small compensation if you make a purchase after clicking on one of our affiliate links. Listed below is our method. This is especially true in the early days when a baby’s sleep patterns are unpredictable and he or she may wake up many times every night. Many people worry about the effects of caffeine on their newborns when they drink a cup of coffee in the morning to help them manage sleep loss.

  1. In this post, you will learn about the dangers and advantages of drinking coffee while nursing, as well as alternate sources of caffeine that you can use.
  2. Drinking caffeine before nursing is unlikely to have any negative impact on the infant.
  3. While caffeine can have a negative impact on a nursing newborn, it is considerably less likely.
  4. Medications and Mother’s Milk author Dr.
  5. A woman’s breast milk contains just around one percent of the caffeine she drinks, and this miniscule amount is not enough to cause harm to the majority of infants in her care.
  6. 2–3 cups of coffee provide the same amount of caffeine as this serving size!
  7. Nevertheless, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warns that excessive caffeine use (more than 10 cups per day) might induce symptoms in the newborn, such as fussiness and jitteriness.
  8. In order to determine whether their infant is experiencing any side effects from the caffeine, a person who has recently breastfed may want to keep an eye on their child throughout this time period.
  9. Caffeine is a popular topic of discussion among specialists, but a 2012 research of 885 newborns in Brazil found that it did not have an adverse effect on their sleep.
  10. The use of coffee caffeine during nursing, according to a Korean study, has no major dangers, particularly when consumed in moderation, such as a few cups per day.
  11. Some individuals believe that the acids in coffee may diminish the iron level of breast milk.

There are no medical reasons to refrain from drinking coffee during nursing, so people should do whatever makes them feel most at ease. It’s also not clear whether or not caffeine has any direct benefits for the child.

  • Chocolate and cocoa goods
  • Black, green, and white tea
  • Cola drinks

There is no scientific evidence to suggest that someone should refrain from drinking caffeine while nursing, albeit it is prudent to do so in moderation. Caffeine consumption can be controlled in a variety of methods, including:

  • Keeping an eye on the child. It is important to consider how other dietary choices, other than caffeine, may effect the baby’s behavior. Some newborns are sensitive to caffeine and may become irritable or restless if the breast milk contains too much caffeine. Similarly to caffeine, a high-sugar beverage may have the same effect on a child as caffeine. Recognizing that the well-being of the adult is also important. It is not necessary for those who use caffeine to help them retain energy and deal with frequent nightly wake-ups and early mornings to feel guilty about consuming a moderate amount of it. Caffeine consumption immediately following a breastfeeding or pumping session. Because of the frequency with which a baby feeds, this may provide enough time for the caffeine level of the milk to decrease before the following breastfeeding session
  • Making an exception in the case of a preterm newborn. Talking to a doctor or lactation consultant about caffeine is especially important if the infant was born prematurely or has a specific medical issue, such as food intolerances. Putting a stop to things. People who drink more than 2–3 cups of coffee per day may want to experiment with gradually lowering the amount of caffeine they consume by preparing “half-caf” cups, which are a mixture of normal and decaf coffee

Breastfeeding mothers who want additional information about finding a balance between the dangers and benefits of coffee should speak with their doctor or a lactation specialist.

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